Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why do relatively positioned divs cover fixed positioned divs?

Here is an example:

HTML (with relatively fixed div wrapping content)

<div id="topheading">
    Example Example Example Example Example Example Example Example
</div>
<div class="main">
<div class="centerpage">
        <div class="contentbox1">
            Test
        </div>
        <div class="contentbox1">
            Test 2
        </div>
        <div class="contentbox1">
            Test 3
        </div>
</div>
</div>

CSS

#topheading {
    position: fixed;
    top: 0px;
    left: 0px;
    height: 58px;
    width: 100%;
    background-color: rgba(194, 194, 194, .5);
}

.main {
    position: relative;
    width: 100%;
}

.centerpage {
    width: 99%;
    background: #ccc;
    overflow: hidden;
    margin-top: 62px;
    margin-bottom: 2px;
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
}

.contentbox1 {
    float: left;
    width: 99%;
    background: #448;
    min-height: 200px;
    border: solid black 2px;
}

JSFiddle

The fixed positioned div becomes covered by the relatively positioned div when you scroll down; How come?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of CSS positioning relative over fixed/absolute –  GrawCube Mar 25 at 0:00
    
Add z-index:1 to #topheader's CSS properties :) –  GrawCube Mar 25 at 0:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I believe this is because the z-index of the divs is implicitly set by the order in which they are parsed. That is to say,

<div class="main">
    <div class="centerpage">
        <div class="contentbox1">
            Test
        </div>
        <div class="contentbox1">
            Test 2
        </div>
        <div class="contentbox1">
            Test 3
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
<div id="topheading">
    Example Example Example Example Example Example Example Example
</div>

Seems to solve your problem.

EDIT: Though, as others have stated, the more expressive way to solve this would be to use z-index.

#topheading {
    position: fixed;
    top: 0px;
    left: 0px;
    height: 58px;
    width: 100%;
    background-color: rgba(194, 194, 194, .5);
    z-index:1;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.