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I'm looking to create a hash with sha256 using openssl and C++. I know there's a similar post about this here:

generate sha hash in openssl, but I'm looking to specifically create sha256.

UPDATE:

Seems to be a problem witht he include paths. It can't find any openssl functions even though I included

#include "openssl/sha.h"

and I included the paths in my build

-I/opt/ssl/include/ -L/opt/ssl/lib/ -lcrypto 
share|improve this question
    
Also as a bonus, it would be nice if it would output the hash in binary :) –  Stanislav Palatnik Feb 14 '10 at 19:29
1  
I posted a new answer there which explains what you want. You could close this question as duplicate if that answer helps. –  AndiDog Feb 14 '10 at 20:01
    
@AndiDog - Everything seems to work right, except the compiler cannot find the functions. It could not even find a reference to SHA1. Also coudln't find any of the SHA256 functions like `SHA256_Final'. Not sure what I'm doing wrong, I included #include "openssl/sha.h" and I included the include and library during the compilation -I/opt/ssl/include/ -L/opt/ssl/lib/ -lcrypto –  Stanislav Palatnik Feb 14 '10 at 20:26
    
As you can see in the header (google.com/codesearch/p?hl=en#2CnO_mGaYOA/source/…), the SHA256 functions are only defined if OpenSSL is compiled with it. So check the value of OPENSSL_NO_SHA256 to see what's wrong. The -lcrypto parameter should be correct. –  AndiDog Feb 14 '10 at 21:07
    
It also doesn't work with any sha1 functions either :/ –  Stanislav Palatnik Feb 14 '10 at 21:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Here's how I did it:

void sha256(char *string, char outputBuffer[65])
{
    unsigned char hash[SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH];
    SHA256_CTX sha256;
    SHA256_Init(&sha256);
    SHA256_Update(&sha256, string, strlen(string));
    SHA256_Final(hash, &sha256);
    int i = 0;
    for(i = 0; i < SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH; i++)
    {
        sprintf(outputBuffer + (i * 2), "%02x", hash[i]);
    }
    outputBuffer[64] = 0;
}

int sha256_file(char *path, char outputBuffer[65])
{
    FILE *file = fopen(path, "rb");
    if(!file) return -534;

    byte hash[SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH];
    SHA256_CTX sha256;
    SHA256_Init(&sha256);
    const int bufSize = 32768;
    byte *buffer = malloc(bufSize);
    int bytesRead = 0;
    if(!buffer) return ENOMEM;
    while((bytesRead = fread(buffer, 1, bufSize, file)))
    {
        SHA256_Update(&sha256, buffer, bytesRead);
    }
    SHA256_Final(hash, &sha256);

    sha256_hash_string(hash, outputBuffer);
    fclose(file);
    free(buffer);
    return 0;
}

It's called like this:

static unsigned char buffer[65];
sha256("string", buffer);
printf("%s\n", buffer);
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, for everyone using the great QT :) - You can also use this, just add to your project file LIBS +=-lcrypto and then you can just convert the code to a class and everything will work fine ;) –  TCB13 Aug 29 '11 at 23:58
2  
-1: “SHA1_Init(), SHA1_Update() and SHA1_Final() return 1 for success, 0 otherwise.”, openssl.org/docs/crypto/sha.htm. –  jww Jan 4 '12 at 19:19
    
@noloader Irrelevant since these functions aren’t used here. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 25 '13 at 10:27
1  
@Konrad Rudolph Its the same API interface, and the OpenSSL man pages lead back to the SHA1 stuff. Ignoring return values in high integrity software is very bad karma. –  jww Mar 26 '13 at 3:26
1  
What the heck is sha256_hash_string(...) looks like you reference a non-existent function in your code... –  UpAndAdam Aug 26 '14 at 19:43

std based

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

#include <openssl/sha.h>
string sha256(const string str)
{
    unsigned char hash[SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH];
    SHA256_CTX sha256;
    SHA256_Init(&sha256);
    SHA256_Update(&sha256, str.c_str(), str.size());
    SHA256_Final(hash, &sha256);
    stringstream ss;
    for(int i = 0; i < SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH; i++)
    {
        ss << hex << setw(2) << setfill('0') << (int)hash[i];
    }
    return ss.str();
}

int main() {
    cout << sha256("1234567890_1") << endl;
    cout << sha256("1234567890_2") << endl;
    cout << sha256("1234567890_3") << endl;
    cout << sha256("1234567890_4") << endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Haven't tested this out, but this definitely looks cleaner than all the other "C++" versions. –  Stanislav Palatnik May 23 '12 at 4:58
1  
This code compiles and produced the expected output. On ubuntu, you can use: sudo apt-get install libssl-dev && g++ -lcrypto main.cc to compile it. –  Homer6 Jan 12 '13 at 4:03

I think that You only have to replace SHA1 function with SHA256 function with tatk code from link in Your post

share|improve this answer

A more "C++"ish version

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

#include "openssl/sha.h"

using namespace std;

string to_hex(unsigned char s) {
    stringstream ss;
    ss << hex << (int) s;
    return ss.str();
}   

string sha256(string line) {    
    unsigned char hash[SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH];
    SHA256_CTX sha256;
    SHA256_Init(&sha256);
    SHA256_Update(&sha256, line.c_str(), line.length());
    SHA256_Final(hash, &sha256);

    string output = "";    
    for(int i = 0; i < SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH; i++) {
        output += to_hex(hash[i]);
    }
    return output;
}

int main() {
    cout << sha256("hello, world") << endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1: “SHA1_Init(), SHA1_Update() and SHA1_Final() return 1 for success, 0 otherwise.”, openssl.org/docs/crypto/sha.htm. –  jww Jan 4 '12 at 19:22
3  
didn't want to obscure the code with C-style return value checks. DIY if you care –  Max Feb 8 '12 at 22:24
7  
"DIY if you care" - sorry to inconvenience you. Folks will blindly copy/paste it. Ignoring return values is a dangerous practice, and should not be demonstarated (especially in high integrity code). –  jww Feb 14 '12 at 23:58
    
@jww I cried reading your comment because it's true, people will write "secure" applications by copy-and-paste programming. But I also agree to some degree with Max only because it shouldn't be on our shoulders to prevent stupid people from incorrectly using our knowledge, or stupid people from using "secure" software written by a copy and paste programmer. –  Technik Empire Mar 10 at 20:12

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