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I'm building the following RK4 code in fortran 2003. In both functions I do allocation of memory. Since my step and sine function will be called a lot, this seems really inefficient to me. What is the best/cleanest way to get rid of those allocates but without losing the ability to plug in any function that satisfies the interface 'fi'?

I still want my rk4 to be able to handle any size of state vector x

module rk4


  interface
     function fi(t,x) result (fx)
       real, dimension(:), intent(in) :: x
       real, intent(in) :: t
       real, allocatable, dimension(:) ::  fx
     end function fi
  end interface



contains

  pure function sine(t,x) result (fx)
    real, dimension(:), intent(in) :: x
    real, intent(in) :: t
    real, allocatable, dimension(:)::  fx
    allocate(fx(size(x)))

    fx(1) = x(2)
    fx(2) = -x(1)
  end function sine

  function step(x,f,dt) result(xn)
    real, intent(in) :: dt
    real, intent(in),  dimension(:) :: x
    real, allocatable, dimension(:)  :: k1,k2,k3,k4,xn
    procedure(fi) :: f
    integer :: N


    N = size(x)
    allocate(k1(N))
    allocate(k2(N))
    allocate(k3(N))
    allocate(k4(N))

    k1 = f(dt,x)
    k2 = f(dt+0.5*dt,x+0.5*k1*dt)
    k3 = f(dt+0.5*dt,x+0.5*k2*dt)
    k4 = f(dt+dt,x+dt*k3)


    allocate(xn(N))
    xn = x + (dt/6.)*(k1 + 2*k2 + 2*k3 + k4)

    deallocate(k1)
    deallocate(k2)
    deallocate(k3)
    deallocate(k4)

  end function step

end module rk4
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use an automatic function result (i.e. a function result that depends on the characteristics of the arguments of the function). Similarly, use automatic variables for the intermediate calculations inside the step procedure.

(The compiler may still implement automatic variables using internal memory allocation routines similar to what allocate does, but this answers the question you asked ;) Alternatively (or in some sort of combination) the compiler may put the storage for the automatic variable and results on the stack. If the size of the automatic things put on the stack is large then you may run out of stack.)

module rk4
  abstract interface    ! clearer if this is abstract.
    function fi(t,x) result (fx)
      real, dimension(:), intent(in) :: x
      real, intent(in) :: t
      ! Automatic function result - size of the result is 
      ! the size of the x argument.
      real, dimension(size(x)) ::  fx
    end function fi
  end interface
contains
  pure function sine(t,x) result (fx)
    real, dimension(:), intent(in) :: x
    real, intent(in) :: t
    real, dimension(size(x))::  fx
    fx(1) = x(2)
    fx(2) = -x(1)
  end function sine

  function step(x,f,dt) result(xn)
    real, intent(in) :: dt
    real, intent(in),  dimension(:) :: x
    ! xn is an automatic result, the others are just automatic.
    real, dimension(size(x))  :: k1,k2,k3,k4,xn
    procedure(fi) :: f

    k1 = f(dt,x)
    k2 = f(dt+0.5*dt,x+0.5*k1*dt)
    k3 = f(dt+0.5*dt,x+0.5*k2*dt)
    k4 = f(dt+dt,x+dt*k3)

    xn = x + (dt/6.)*(k1 + 2*k2 + 2*k3 + k4)
  end function step
end module rk4
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This does what I require. One question. Will it also be more efficient? –  tgoossens Mar 25 at 12:05
    
That depends (measure and find out), but probably no worse. –  IanH Mar 25 at 12:17
    
If the compiler decides to use heap arrays for this (-heap-arrays n in ifort, similar for others), the overhead can still be significant. –  Vladimir F Apr 1 at 10:30

If the sizes do not differ between the invocations, you can make the arrays module variables. Be careful when calling the procedures concurrently, for example, in OpenMP threadprivate may be needed.

You would also need another subroutines for initialization (allocation) of the arrays and finalization(deallocation). The allocation can be done on first call.

In Fortran 2003 OOP you would move the allocation to the constructor, deallocation to the final procedure and made the arrays components of the solver class.

You do not need Fortran 2003, you can just make a derived type with the buffers and pass them as type and not class.

type Solver
  integer :: n
  real, allocatable, dimension(:) ::  fx
  real, allocatable, dimension(:)  :: k1,k2,k3,k4
contains
  procedure :: sine
  procedure :: step
  final :: finalize
end type

interface Solver
  Solver_init
end interface

....

  function Solver_init(n) result(S)
    type(Solver) :: S
    S%n = n

   allocate(S%k1(n) ....

   ...

  pure function sine(S,t,x) result (fx)
    class(Solver), intent(inout) :: S
    real, dimension(:), intent(in) :: x
    real, intent(in) :: t
    real, dimension(b%n)::  fx

  ....

  function step(b,x,f,dt) result(xn)
    class(Solver), intent(inout) :: S
    real, intent(in) :: dt
    real, intent(in),  dimension(:) :: x
    real, dimension(b%n)  :: xn

 ...

 subroutine finalize(S)
   class(Solver), intent(inout) :: S

   deallocate(B%k1 ....


   ...
share|improve this answer
    
Am I still able to use two RK4 integrators for two different (sizes) functions at the same time. I.e. aren't the module variables some sort of "global state" ? –  tgoossens Mar 25 at 8:36
    
Yes, that's why I asked. And why I also offered the object oriented alternative. –  Vladimir F Mar 25 at 8:41
    
In Fortran 77 it was usual to pass some workplace buffers to subroutine, now I would really pass a derived type. –  Vladimir F Mar 25 at 8:42

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