Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following function, which I use (admitedly, as a hack, since I still havent understood javascript's bizzare variable scoping rules), to fetch all global variables with a known prefix, from within a script.

The function works well with FF and Google Chrome (presumbaly it would work with all Moz derivative browsers). However, I just tested it in IE8 (aka Uncle Bill [as in Bill Gates] browser), and (perhaps unsuprisingly), the function did not work. I debugged the function and it appears that global variables are stored in another object (I could be wrong, I've only been reading on JS for a couple of days now). In any case, here is the function, which works correctly in 'Moz bazed browsers:

function getGlobalProperties(prefix) {
  var keyValues = [], global = window; // window for browser environments
  for (var prop in global) {
    if (prop.indexOf(prefix) == 0) // check the prefix
      keyValues.push(prop + "=" + global[prop]);
  }
  return keyValues.join('&'); // build the string
}

Do I need a conditional branch (and a test to see if running under IE)?

share|improve this question
1  
For the record, chrome is not a "mozilla derivative". Mozilla browsers use an engine called gecko, while chrome and safari use webkit. –  Joel Coehoorn Feb 14 '10 at 22:13
    
OOps! - I stand corrected –  Stick it to THE MAN Feb 14 '10 at 22:15
1  
@Joel: the rendering engine is not important to the question, the JS engine is (which would be TraceMonkey in current Firefox builds and V8 in Chrome) –  Christoph Feb 14 '10 at 22:16
2  
@Pindatjuh: Checking that indexOf is zero will ensure that it starts with the prefix. –  Anon. Feb 14 '10 at 22:23
1  
The correct escaping for URL query values would be encodeURIComponent. –  bobince Feb 14 '10 at 23:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's known issue, IE does not expose global variables for for-in loop over window object (inspite that fact that accessing global variables directly like window.globalVar works). The possible workaround is to declare global variables explictly as members of window object, like:

window.globalVar = 1;
...
alert(globalVar); // = 1
globalVar = 'xxx';
alert(window.globalVar); // = xxx

By declaring variables in such way in the beginning of script you'll make them accessible for for-in loop.

The better solution of course is to avoid global vars :-) Or at least keeping all them in separate variable which you can later traverse without hacks.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, in the end I will have to use something along the lines of what you proposed. By confirming that IE does things differently (now theres a suprise), I have written a little function to first check if being run in IE ... –  Stick it to THE MAN Feb 15 '10 at 0:52

it looks like it should work, is global a keyword? try using something else or just the windows variable directly.

share|improve this answer

In IE be sure to also store your properties where you want them to be upon read.

share|improve this answer

global is actually not a JavaScript reserved word.

Try this instead of what you have (commented for potential problems your code is likely running into on IE):

function getGlobalProperties(prefix) {
  var keyValues = [], global = window; // window for browser environments
  for (var prop in global) {
    if (prop.indexOf(prefix) == 0) { // check the prefix
      try {
        // this implicitly converts a window property to a string, which might fail
        keyValues.push(prop + "=" + global[prop]);
      } catch (e) {
        // in case string conversion blows up
        // do something about it here
      }
    }
  }
  return keyValues.join('&'); // build the string
}
share|improve this answer
    
Missing } for if –  Qwerty Feb 14 '10 at 22:31
    
I don't see how this addresses the question? –  AnthonyWJones Feb 14 '10 at 22:34
    
He didn't provide an error (if any) that IE is raising, so I'm making an assumption that something in IE's window object does not like being converted to a string. –  Mike Feb 14 '10 at 22:41
    
I see, in actuality there is no error, I've tried it myself it lists other properties on the window object but not global variables. –  AnthonyWJones Feb 14 '10 at 22:45
    
@AnthonyWJones: You are correct, and that was in the original question. My reading comprehension is terrible today! Should I delete my answer or do you think it adds to the conversation? –  Mike Feb 14 '10 at 23:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.