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Here is the situation. In some cases I find myself wanting a class, let's call it class C that has the same functionalities as class A, but with the addition that it has interface B implemented. For now I do it like this:

class C : A,B
{
   //code that implements interface B, and nothing else
}

The problem will come if class A happens to be sealed. Is there a way I can make class A implement interface B without having to define class C (with extension methods or something)

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Do you control A, or is this some third-party assembly? –  Michael Perrenoud Mar 25 '14 at 12:51
    
@MichaelPerrenoud it is third party –  Mario Stoilov Mar 25 '14 at 12:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Basically: no. That is part of what "mixins" could bring to the table, but the C# languauge doesn't currently support that (it has been discussed a few times, IIRC).

You will have to use your current approach, or (more commonly) just a pass-through decorator that encapsulates A rather than inheriting A.

class C : IB
{
    private readonly A a;
    public C(A a) {
        if(a == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("a");
        this.a = a;
    }

    // methods of IB:
    public int Foo() { return a.SomeMethod(); }
    void IB.Bar() { a.SomeOtherMethod(); }
}
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The only way I see, is to change inheritance to aggregation, like this:

class C : B
{
    public C(A instanceToWrap)
    {
        this.innerA = instanceToWrap;
    }

    //coda that implements B

    private A innerA;
}

There seems to be a possibility to inject interface in run-time, as it is done with Array class and IEnumerable<T> interface, but it seems a bit of an overkill.

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While this is a valid workaround (one that I find myself using actually), it is not what I was asking. Plus, in some cases it causes problems. Still thank you for answering –  Mario Stoilov Mar 25 '14 at 12:55
    
@MarioStoilov There is no other design-only way. What problems in particular do you have in mind? As for the interface injection approach, I'll try to test it when I'm back home and perhaps update my answer. –  BartoszKP Mar 25 '14 at 13:40
    
look at my comment on Michaels answer –  Mario Stoilov Mar 25 '14 at 14:06
    
@MarioStoilov Sorry, still not clear what problems will cause wrapping ObservableCollection with something that additionally implements ISuportIncrementalLoading. –  BartoszKP Mar 25 '14 at 14:18
    
for starters (C is IEnumerable) would be false, which will cause the binding problem in the first place. A workaroud would be to make C implement all of As interfaces and rewroute those methods to A, but that would be a large amount of rewrouting, and in addition (C is A) would be false, and in some cases (though not in this one) i migh want that to be true –  Mario Stoilov Mar 25 '14 at 14:24

Is there a way I can make class A implement interface B without having to define class C (with extension methods or something)

The short answer is no. You can't make A implement B because you don't have control of A. However, I think you're headed down the right road with extension methods. Consider this:

public static class AImplementsBExtensions
{
    public static void Func1(this A o) { }
    public static void Func2(this A o) { }
}

Now clearly I have no idea what methods exist on B, but this is how you can implement B on A when you can't inherit from it.

Bear in mind, this is not an implementation. If you add or remove methods from the interface you'll have to do that by hand here. But now you can do this:

var a = new A();
a.Func1();
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While I know I can add these methods with extension methods, I require (A is B) to be true. An example would be I want the ObservableCollection to implement ISupportIncrementalLoading in WinRT. Just adding the methods did not work there, so I ended up using the way I mentioned in my question (since ObservableCollection is not sealed) –  Mario Stoilov Mar 25 '14 at 13:01

You could try creating your class without the inheritance: class C : B and as a wrapper around A.

Additionally you can provide implicit conversion operators so that code like A obj = new C(new A()) would work similar to how a derived class would work.

class C : B
{
    private A _inner;
    public C(A inner)
    {
        this._inner = inner;
    }

    public A Inner { get { return this._inner; } }

    public static implicit operator A(C obj)
    {
        return obj == null ? (A)null : obj._inner;
    }

    public static implicit operator C(A obj)
    {
        return new C(obj);
    }
}
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