Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
n = 0
m = 40
o = 0
while n < m 
n = n + 1
end
while n = m 
o = o + 1 
n = 0 
end

With that code, what would be the best way to make it so once it went through the second loop it would go back through the first???

Any help for this beginner is welcomed. :)

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by casperOne Feb 24 '12 at 14:43

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
You mean like just putting the code for the first loop after the second one? –  Anon. Feb 15 '10 at 1:56
    
yes-- minus the copying and pasting. –  lbburdick Feb 15 '10 at 1:58
1  
can you explain what you are trying to do? (the code seems weird, having a while loop than depends on m, yet setting n to 0. –  moogs Feb 15 '10 at 2:00
    
It seems like you want to factor that out into a function, and call it from both places. –  Anon. Feb 15 '10 at 2:01
2  
Can you say why you're doing this, rather than how you're trying to do it? There might be a Ruby way cut through the confusion and let the language do most of the work, if only we know the goal. –  Wayne Conrad Feb 15 '10 at 5:23

3 Answers 3

Are you looking for something like this?

n = 0
m = 40
o = 0
while n < m 
  n = n + 1
  if (n == m) {
    o = o + 1
    n = 0
  }
  // as pointed out by Samir, you might want to put
  // termination condition here, else it will loop infinitely
end
share|improve this answer
    
Yes!! Exactly that. Thanks –  lbburdick Feb 15 '10 at 2:21
4  
That code will loop infinitely. Are you sure that's what you want? –  Samir Talwar Feb 15 '10 at 2:24

Not entirely sure you've given us enough information to solve this one. I'm not sure what you are trying to do.

It would be unusual to use while like this in Ruby. There are lots of better ways to iterate. For example, if you are walking through an array, you can do:

my_array.each do |e|
   # e is the next element of my_array
end

If you are walking through a string, you can do:

my_string.each_char do |c|
   # c is the next character in my_string
end

If you really want a counter, you can use each_with_index for an array, or for a string:

(1..my_string.size).each do |i|
   c = my_string[i - 1]
   # now c = next character, i = index
end

Not a direct answer to your question, I admit, but DJ & DigitalRoss are correct, you seem to be working towards nested loops.

share|improve this answer

Nested loops, maybe?

Are you looking for something like this:

(0..2).each do |o|
  (0..4).each do |n|
    p [o, n]
  end
end

Adjust the loop boundaries as you like...

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.