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ref^ refers to the commit before ref, what about getting the commit after ref?

For example, if I git checkout 12345 how do I check out the next commit?

Thanks.

PS Yes, git's a DAG node pointer struct tree whatever. How do I find the commit after this one?

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3  
Duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/1761825/… –  hcs42 Feb 15 '10 at 22:23
    
Thanks, the answer there is the only solution I've heard so far. –  Schwern Feb 16 '10 at 22:35
    
See also "git children-of"! –  VonC Nov 22 '13 at 9:47

8 Answers 8

up vote 50 down vote accepted

To list all the commits, starting from the current one, and then its child, and so on - basically standard git log, but going the other way in time, use something like

git log --reverse --ancestry-path 894e8b4e93d8f3^..master

where 894e8b4e93d8f3 is the first commit you want to show.

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Two years later, that works! –  Schwern Mar 26 '12 at 16:32
1  
For the specific case in the original question, just substitute HEAD^ for 894e8b4e93d8f3^. –  Søren Løvborg Apr 14 at 14:30

The creator for Hudson (now Jenkins) Kohsuke Kawaguchi just published (November 2013):
kohsuke / git-children-of:

Given a commit, find immediate children of that commit.

#!/bin/bash -e
# given a commit, find immediate children of that commit.
for arg in "$@"; do
  for commit in $(git rev-parse $arg^0); do
    for child in $(git log --format='%H %P' --all | grep -F " $commit" | cut -f1 -d' '); do
      git describe $child
    done
  done
done

As illustrated by this thread, in a VCS based on history represented by a DAG (Directed Acyclic Graph), there is not "one parent" or "one child".

        C1 -> C2 -> C3
      /               \
A -> B                  E -> F
      \               /
        D1 -> D2 ----/

The ordering of commits is done by "topo-order" or "date-order" (see GitPro book)

But since Git1.6.0, you can list the children of a commit.

git rev-list --children
git log --children

Note: for parent commits, you have the same issue, with the suffix ^ to a revision parameter meaning the first parent of that commit object. ^<n> means the <n>th parent (i.e. rev^ is equivalent to rev^1).

If you are on branch foo and issue "git merge bar" then foo will be the first parent.
I.e: The first parent is the branch you were on when you merged, and the second is the commit on the branch that you merged in.

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1  
git rev-list --children sure looks like what I want, but it doesn't DWIM. It appears to list all the parents and their children. I suppose I can list them all and parse through them... bleh, but its something. –  Schwern Feb 16 '10 at 22:36
    
@Schwern: true, git rev-list --children is not for listing just children, but for listing parents with their children... you always need to parse. –  VonC Feb 16 '10 at 23:06

There is no unique "next commit". Because history in Git is a DAG, and not a line, many commits can have a common parent (branches), and commits can have more than one parent (merges).

If you have a particular branch in mind, you can look at its log and see what commit lists the present one as its parent.

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11  
By that logic there's no "previous commit" either, but there's plenty of syntax for getting the parent(s). –  Schwern Feb 15 '10 at 5:49
5  
@Schwern: There is no "previous commit" either; <rev>^ is "parent commit" ('first parent' for merge commits). –  Jakub Narębski Feb 16 '10 at 0:22

what I found is

git rev-list --ancestry-path commit1..commit2

where I set commit1 as the current commit and commit2 to the current head. This returns me a list of all commits which build a path between commit1 and commit2.

The last line of the output is the child of commit1 (on the path to commit2).

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If the child commits are all on some branch, you can use "gitk --all commit^..", where "commit" is something identifying the commit. For example, if the commit's abbreviated SHA-1 is c6661c5, then type "gitk --all c6661c5^.."

You will probably need to enter the full SHA-1 into gitk's "SHA1 ID:" cell. You will need the full SHA-1, which for this example can be obtained via "git rev-parse c6661c5"

Alternatively, "git rev-list --all --children | grep '^c6661c5883bb53d400ce160a5897610ecedbdc9d' will produce a line containing all the children of this commit, presumably whether or not there is a branch involved.

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I know what you mean. It's frustrating to have plentiful syntax for going to previous commits, but none to go to the next ones. In a complex history, the problem of "what is the next commit" becomes rather hard, but then in complex merging the same hardness emerges with 'previous' commits as well. In the simple case, inside a single branch with a linear history (even just locally for some limited number of commits) it would be nice and make sense to go forward and backward.

The real problem with this, however, is that the children commits are not referenced, it's a backwards-linked list only. Finding the child commit takes a search, which isn't too bad, but probably not something git wants to put into the refspec logic.

At any rate, I came upon this question because I simply want to step forward in the history one commit at a time, doing tests, and sometimes you have to step forward and not backward. Well, with some more thought I came up with this solution:

Pick a commit ahead of where you're at. This could probably be a branch head. If you're at branch~10, then "git checkout branch~9" then "git checkout branch~8" to get the next after that, then "git checkout branch~7" and so on.

Decrementing the number should be really easy in a script if you need it. A lot easier than parsing git rev-list.

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While useful, it doesn't find the next commit. It walks towards the current commit. –  Schwern Feb 28 '12 at 11:41
    
Well then I suppose you could do: "BRANCH=master; git co $BRANCH~$[ $(git rev-list HEAD..$BRANCH | wc -l) - 1 ]" You've got to go towards a branch, no way around that. –  vontrapp Jul 20 '13 at 5:43

I managed to find the next child the following way:

git log --reverse --children -n1 HEAD (where 'n' is the number of children to show)
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Each commit stores a pointer to its parent (parents, in case of merge(standard) commit).

So, there is no way to point to a child commit (if there is one) from the parent.

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Commit cannot store pointers to its children, as additional child commits (branching points) can be added at later point. –  Jakub Narębski Feb 16 '10 at 0:23
    
@Jakub I don't really follow. They can't be added later? –  Schwern Feb 16 '10 at 5:30
1  
Jakub: Thats exactly what I said. 'Each commit stores pointers only to its parent.' –  Lakshman Prasad Feb 16 '10 at 6:22
    
@Schwern: Commits in git are immutable (which has nice consequence of accountability), so pointers to children cound't "be added later". One of the reasons is that identifier of commit (used e.g. in "parent" links) depends on the contents of the comit; this is the only solution in distributed system, without central numbering authority. Also "children" of commits depends on the branches you have, and this in turn can be different from repository to repository (and commits are the same in each repository). –  Jakub Narębski Feb 16 '10 at 11:08
2  
@becomingGuru I down voted it. It may be true, but it does not answer my question. The question is "how do I find the next commit in git?" It is not "does a git commit store a pointer to its children?" –  Schwern Feb 16 '10 at 22:32

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