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In my application - there are four buttons named as follows.

  • Top - left
  • Bottom - left
  • Top - right
  • Bottom - right

Above this buttons there is an image view / or we can use also UIView.

Now, suppose user taps on - top - left button. Above image / view should be rounded from that particular corner.

I am having some difficulty in applying rounded corners to the UIView.

Right now I am using following code to apply the rounded corners to each corner of view. Here it is.

    // imgVUserImg is a image view on IB.
    imgVUserImg.image=[UIImage imageWithData:[NSData dataWithContentsOfURL:[NSURL URLWithString:@"any Url Here"];
    CALayer *l = [imgVUserImg layer];
    [l setMasksToBounds:YES];
    [l setCornerRadius:5.0];  
    [l setBorderWidth:2.0];
    [l setBorderColor:[[UIColor darkGrayColor] CGColor]];

Above code is applying the roundness to each of corners of supplied View. Instead I just wanted to apply roundness to selected corners like - top / top+left / bottom+right etc.

Is it possible ? IF yes then, How?

Thanks in advance for sharing your knowledge.

Sagar.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 37 down vote accepted
+100

I used the answer over at How do I create a round cornered UILabel on the iPhone? and the code from How is a rounded rect view with transparency done on iphone? to make this code.

Then I realized I'd answered the wrong question (gave a rounded UILabel instead of UIImage) so I used this code to change it:

http://discussions.apple.com/thread.jspa?threadID=1683876

Make an iPhone project with the View template. In the view controller, add this:

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    CGRect rect = CGRectMake(10, 10, 200, 100);
    MyView *myView = [[MyView alloc] initWithFrame:rect];
    [self.view addSubview:myView];
    [super viewDidLoad];
}

MyView is just a UIImageView subclass:

@interface MyView : UIImageView
{
}

I'd never used graphics contexts before, but I managed to hobble together this code. It's missing the code for two of the corners. If you read the code, you can see how I implemented this (by deleting some of the CGContextAddArc calls, and deleting some of the radius values in the code. The code for all corners is there, so use that as a starting point and delete the parts that create corners you don't need. Note that you can make rectangles with 2 or 3 rounded corners too if you want.

The code's not perfect, but I'm sure you can tidy it up a little bit.

static void addRoundedRectToPath(CGContextRef context, CGRect rect, float radius, int roundedCornerPosition)
{

    // all corners rounded
    //  CGContextMoveToPoint(context, rect.origin.x, rect.origin.y + radius);
    //  CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, rect.origin.x, rect.origin.y + rect.size.height - radius);
    //  CGContextAddArc(context, rect.origin.x + radius, rect.origin.y + rect.size.height - radius, 
    //                  radius, M_PI / 4, M_PI / 2, 1);
    //  CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, rect.origin.x + rect.size.width - radius, 
    //                          rect.origin.y + rect.size.height);
    //  CGContextAddArc(context, rect.origin.x + rect.size.width - radius, 
    //                  rect.origin.y + rect.size.height - radius, radius, M_PI / 2, 0.0f, 1);
    //  CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, rect.origin.x + rect.size.width, rect.origin.y + radius);
    //  CGContextAddArc(context, rect.origin.x + rect.size.width - radius, rect.origin.y + radius, 
    //                  radius, 0.0f, -M_PI / 2, 1);
    //  CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, rect.origin.x + radius, rect.origin.y);
    //  CGContextAddArc(context, rect.origin.x + radius, rect.origin.y + radius, radius, 
    //                  -M_PI / 2, M_PI, 1);

    // top left
    if (roundedCornerPosition == 1) {
        CGContextMoveToPoint(context, rect.origin.x, rect.origin.y + radius);
        CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, rect.origin.x, rect.origin.y + rect.size.height - radius);
        CGContextAddArc(context, rect.origin.x + radius, rect.origin.y + rect.size.height - radius, 
                        radius, M_PI / 4, M_PI / 2, 1);
        CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, rect.origin.x + rect.size.width, 
                                rect.origin.y + rect.size.height);
        CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, rect.origin.x + rect.size.width, rect.origin.y);
        CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, rect.origin.x, rect.origin.y);
    }   

    // bottom left
    if (roundedCornerPosition == 2) {
        CGContextMoveToPoint(context, rect.origin.x, rect.origin.y);
        CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, rect.origin.x, rect.origin.y + rect.size.height);
        CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, rect.origin.x + rect.size.width, 
                                rect.origin.y + rect.size.height);
        CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, rect.origin.x + rect.size.width, rect.origin.y);
        CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, rect.origin.x + radius, rect.origin.y);
        CGContextAddArc(context, rect.origin.x + radius, rect.origin.y + radius, radius, 
                        -M_PI / 2, M_PI, 1);
    }

    // add the other corners here


    CGContextClosePath(context);
    CGContextRestoreGState(context);
}


-(UIImage *)setImage
{
    UIImage *img = [UIImage imageNamed:@"my_image.png"];
    int w = img.size.width;
    int h = img.size.height;

    CGColorSpaceRef colorSpace = CGColorSpaceCreateDeviceRGB();
    CGContextRef context = CGBitmapContextCreate(NULL, w, h, 8, 4 * w, colorSpace, kCGImageAlphaPremultipliedFirst);

    CGContextBeginPath(context);
    CGRect rect = CGRectMake(0, 0, w, h);


    addRoundedRectToPath(context, rect, 50, 1);
    CGContextClosePath(context);
    CGContextClip(context);

    CGContextDrawImage(context, rect, img.CGImage);

    CGImageRef imageMasked = CGBitmapContextCreateImage(context);
    CGContextRelease(context);
    CGColorSpaceRelease(colorSpace);
    [img release];

    return [UIImage imageWithCGImage:imageMasked];
}

alt text

Don't forget that you'll need to get the QuartzCore framework in there for this to work.

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Doesn't work as expected with views whose size might change. Example: a UILabel. Setting the mask path and then changing the size by setting text to it will keep the old mask. Will need subclassing and overloading the drawRect. –  user3099609 Oct 1 at 14:24

Starting in iOS 3.2, you can use the functionality of UIBezierPaths to create an out-of-the-box rounded rect (where only corners you specify are rounded). You can then use this as the path of a CAShapeLayer, and use this as a mask for your view's layer:

// Create the path (with only the top-left corner rounded)
UIBezierPath *maskPath = [UIBezierPath bezierPathWithRoundedRect:imageView.bounds 
                                               byRoundingCorners:UIRectCornerTopLeft
                                                     cornerRadii:CGSizeMake(10.0, 10.0)];

// Create the shape layer and set its path
CAShapeLayer *maskLayer = [CAShapeLayer layer];
maskLayer.frame = imageView.bounds;
maskLayer.path = maskPath.CGPath;

// Set the newly created shape layer as the mask for the image view's layer
imageView.layer.mask = maskLayer;

And that's it - no messing around manually defining shapes in Core Graphics, no creating masking images in Photoshop. The layer doesn't even need invalidating. Applying the rounded corner or changing to a new corner is as simple as defining a new UIBezierPath and using its CGPath as the mask layer's path. The corners parameter of the bezierPathWithRoundedRect:byRoundingCorners:cornerRadii: method is a bitmask, and so multiple corners can be rounded by ORing them together.


EDIT: Adding a shadow

If you're looking to add a shadow to this, a little more work is required.

Because "imageView.layer.mask = maskLayer" applies a mask, a shadow will not ordinarily show outside of it. The trick is to use a transparent view, and then add two sublayers (CALayers) to the view's layer: shadowLayer and roundedLayer. Both need to make use of the UIBezierPath. The image is added as the content of roundedLayer.

// Create a transparent view
UIView *theView = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:theFrame];
[theView setBackgroundColor:[UIColor clearColor]];

// Create the path (with only the top-left corner rounded)
UIBezierPath *maskPath = [UIBezierPath bezierPathWithRoundedRect:theView.bounds 
                                               byRoundingCorners:UIRectCornerTopLeft
                                                     cornerRadii:CGSizeMake(10.0f, 10.0f)];

// Create the shadow layer
CAShapeLayer *shadowLayer = [CAShapeLayer layer];
[shadowLayer setFrame:theView.bounds];
[shadowLayer setMasksToBounds:NO];
[shadowLayer setShadowPath:maskPath.CGPath];
// ...
// Set the shadowColor, shadowOffset, shadowOpacity & shadowRadius as required
// ...

// Create the rounded layer, and mask it using the rounded mask layer
CALayer *roundedLayer = [CALayer layer];
[roundedLayer setFrame:theView.bounds];
[roundedLayer setContents:(id)theImage.CGImage];

CAShapeLayer *maskLayer = [CAShapeLayer layer];
[maskLayer setFrame:theView.bounds];
[maskLayer setPath:maskPath.CGPath];

roundedLayer.mask = maskLayer;

// Add these two layers as sublayers to the view
[theView.layer addSublayer:shadowLayer];
[theView.layer addSublayer:roundedLayer];
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1  
Nice one, this helped me a lot on grouped UITableView cell's selectedBackgroundViews :-) –  Luke47 Oct 27 '11 at 10:06
    
Anyway to add a drop shadow to this view after you've rounded the corners? Attempted the following without success. ` self.layer.masksToBounds = NO; self.layer.shadowColor = [UIColor blackColor].CGColor; self.layer.shadowRadius = 3; self.layer.shadowOffset = CGSizeMake(-3, 3); self.layer.shadowOpacity = 0.8; self.layer.shouldRasterize = YES; ` –  Chris Wagner Nov 4 '11 at 22:13
1  
@ChrisWagner: See my edit, with regards to applying a shadow to the rounded view. –  Stuart Nov 5 '11 at 0:37
    
@StuDev excellent! I had gone with a subview for the shadow view but this is much nicer! Didn't think to add sub layers like this. Thanks! –  Chris Wagner Nov 7 '11 at 19:28
    
Why does my image becomes white, then when I scroll the UITableView and the cell is recreated - it works! Why? –  Fernando Redondo Nov 16 '11 at 14:34

I have used this code in many places in my code and it works 100% correctly. You can change any corder by changed one property "byRoundingCorners:UIRectCornerBottomLeft"

UIBezierPath *maskPath = [UIBezierPath bezierPathWithRoundedRect:view.bounds byRoundingCorners:UIRectCornerBottomLeft cornerRadii:CGSizeMake(10.0, 10.0)];

                CAShapeLayer *maskLayer = [[CAShapeLayer alloc] init];
                maskLayer.frame = view.bounds;
                maskLayer.path = maskPath.CGPath;
                view.layer.mask = maskLayer;
                [maskLayer release];
share|improve this answer
    
When using this solution on UITableView-subviews (e.g. UITableViewCells or UITableViewHeaderFooterViews) it results in bad smoothness when scrolling. Another approach for that use is this solution with a better performance (it adds a cornerRadius to all corners). To 'show' only specific corners rounded (like top and bottom right corners) I added a subview with a negative value on its frame.origin.x and assigned the cornerRadius to its layer. If someone found a better solution, I'm interested. –  anneblue Mar 4 at 12:08

See this related question. You'll have to draw your own rectangle to a CGPath with some rounded corners, add the CGPath to your CGContext and then clip to it using CGContextClip.

You can also draw the rounded rect with alpha values to an image and then use that image to create a new layer which you set as your layer's mask property (see Apple's documentation).

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there is an easier and faster answer that may work depending on your needs and also works with shadows. you can set maskToBounds on the superlayer to true, and offset the child layers so that 2 of their corners are outside the superlayer bounds, effectively cutting the rounded corners on 2 sides away.

of course this only works when you want to have only 2 rounded corners on the same side and the content of the layer looks the same when you cut off a few pixels from one side. works great for having bar charts rounded only on the top side.

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Stuarts example for rounding specific corners works great. If you want to round multiple corners like top left and right this is how to do it

// Create the path (with only the top-left corner rounded)
UIBezierPath *maskPath = [UIBezierPath bezierPathWithRoundedRect:imageview
                                               byRoundingCorners:UIRectCornerTopLeft|UIRectCornerTopRight
                                                     cornerRadii:CGSizeMake(10.0, 10.0)];

// Create the shape layer and set its path
CAShapeLayer *maskLayer = [CAShapeLayer layer];
maskLayer.frame = imageview.bounds;
maskLayer.path = maskPath.CGPath;

// Set the newly created shape layer as the mask for the image view's layer
imageview.layer.mask = maskLayer; 
share|improve this answer
    
When using this solution on UITableView-subviews (e.g. UITableViewCells or UITableViewHeaderFooterViews) it results in bad smoothness when scrolling. Another approach for that use is this solution with a better performance (it adds a cornerRadius to all corners). To 'show' only specific corners rounded (like top and bottom right corners) I added a subview with a negative value on its frame.origin.x and assigned the cornerRadius to its layer. If someone found a better solution, I'm interested. –  anneblue Mar 4 at 11:56

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