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This might seem like a weird question, but how would I create a C++ function that tells whether a given C++ function that takes as a parameter a variable of type X and returns a variable of type X, is injective in the space of machine representation of those variables, i.e. never returns the same variable for two different variables passed to it?

(For those of you who weren't Math majors, maybe check out this page if you're still confused about the definition of injective: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Injective_function)

For instance, the function

double square(double x) { return x*x}; 

is not injective since square(2.0) = square(-2.0),

but the function

double cube(double x) { return x*x*x};

is, obviously.

The goal is to create a function

 template <typename T>
 bool is_injective(T(*foo)(T))
 {
    /* Create a set std::set<T> retVals;
       For each element x of type T: 
       if x is in retVals, return false;
       if x is not in retVals, add it to retVals;
       Return true if we made it through the above loop.
    */
 }

I think I can implement that procedure except that I'm not sure how to iterate through every element of type T. How do I accomplish that?

Also, what problems might arise in trying to create such a function?

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1  
That smells intractable... –  StoryTeller Mar 25 at 18:12
1  
Isn't that similar to the Halting problem? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halting_problem -- i.e 'you cannot!' –  Soren Mar 25 at 18:13
2  
I bet cube is not injective. double is a very different thing from "real number". –  aschepler Mar 25 at 18:28

4 Answers 4

You need to test every possible bit pattern of length sizeof(T).

There was a widely circulated blog post about this topic recently: There are Only Four Billion Floats - So Test Them All!

In that post, the author was able to test all 32-bit floats in 90 seconds. Turns out that would take a few centuries for 64-bit values.

So this is only possible with small input types.

Multiple inputs, structs, or anything with pointers are going to get impossible fast.

BTW, even with 32-bit values you will probably exhaust system memory trying to store all the output values in a std::set, because std::set uses a lot of extra memory for pointers. Instead, you should use a bitmap that's big enough to hold all 2^sizeof(T) output values. The specialized std::vector<bool> should work. That will take 2^sizeof(T) / 8 bytes of memory.

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I could add: if (sizeof(T) > 4) throw("We don't have a few centuries to run this function, bro."); –  user3461018 Mar 25 at 18:37

Maybe what you need is std::numeric_limits. To store the results, you may use an unordered_map (from std if you're using C++11, or from boost if you're not).

You can check the limits of the data types, maybe something like this might work (it's a dumb solution, but it may get you started):

template <typename T>
bool is_injective(T(*foo)(T))
{
    std::unordered_map<T, T> hash_table;

    T min = std::numeric_limits<T>::min();
    T max = std::numeric_limits<T>::max();

    for(T it = min; i < max; ++i)
    {
        auto result = hash_table.emplace(it, foo(it));
        if(result.second == false)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

Of course, you may want to restrict a few of the possible data types. Otherwise, if you check for floats, doubles or long integers, it'll get very intensive.

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As far as I know, you cannot iterate all possible values of a type in C++.

But, even if you could, that approach would get you nowhere. If your type is a 64 bit integer, you might have to iterate through 2^64 values and keep track of the result for all of them, which is not possible.

Like other people said, there is no solution for a generic type X.

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Yes, but what if your function is actually injective and you never return false? :) - It looks like I am answering to a comment that was already deleted. –  skortzy Mar 25 at 18:29
    
Naturally, you can iterate all possible values. Just construct them as bit patterns, using char[] –  Deduplicator Mar 25 at 19:06
    
In my opinion, not all bit patterns are legal. If X is something fancy (maybe with a virtual table pointer inside), you might get some interesting results. –  skortzy Mar 25 at 19:11
    
I though we spoke about a primitive type? Only the search space size is too big. –  Deduplicator Mar 25 at 19:26
    
The question does not state X is primitive. If it is, you are certainly right. –  skortzy Mar 25 at 19:29

but the function

   double cube(double x) { return x*x*x};

is, obviously.

It is obviously not. There are 2^53 more double values representable in [0..0.5) than in [0..0.125).

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