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I have an issue where the use of pthread_rwlock_t causes a deadlock together with signals on OS X (note: no I am not locking the mutex inside the signal handler).

I've narrowed it down to a reasonably simple test case (if you ignore signal magic), where I have a loop in the main thread that will just lock and unlock the mutex and a signal handler function (invoked through self-pipe) that locks the same mutex. A separate thread repeatedly sends the signal and after a while this deadlocks. If I look in the debugger, it looks like both the main thread and the thread that processes the signal are stuck trying to lock the mutex (but there is no one holding it).

If I switch to using pthread_mutex_t, std::mutex, boost::mutex, or boost::shared_mutex, I cannot reproduce the issue.

Can anyone tell me what is going on? Am I doing something wrong?

My understanding of signals may be broken, so any comments are appreciated.

Here's teh codez for the main logic:

// includes omitted for brevity, see below
// lock_type, mutex_type, SignalHandler omitted for brevity, see below

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    // Call processing function on a signal
    int signalNumber = SIGINT;
    SignalHandler signalHandler(signalNumber, [&](int signal) {
        lock_type lock(mtx);
        printf("Got signal: %d\n", signal);
    });

    // Launch a thread that continously generates the signal
    std::atomic<bool> stopFlag(false);
    std::thread signalGeneratorThread([&]() {
        while (!stopFlag) {
            kill(0, signalNumber);
        }
    });

    // Main loop
    for (int i=0; i<1000; ++i) {
        // Grab lock every iteration
        lock_type lock(global_mutex);
        printf("Iteration %d\n", i);
    }

    // Stop the signal generation thread
    stopFlag = true;
    signalGeneratorThread.join();
    signalHandler.Stop();
    return 0;
}

I am running on OS X 10.8.5, compiling with "clang++ -std=c++11 -stdlib=libc++".

I omitted lock type and SignalHandler definitions in order to keep the above example small and more easily understood. Basically the SignalHandler does the self-pipe trick for signal handling, i.e. when a signal happens, that is written to a pipe that a separate thread is waiting on. That thread then invokes the actual handler function. The lock types are just thin wrappers around the pthread types to make it easy to switch between them when testing this silly example. For full information, I include the omitted code below. My apologies for the wall of text...

#include <fcntl.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#include <atomic>
#include <thread>

namespace {

template<typename MutexType, typename ExtraInitType, int (*init_func)(MutexType *, const ExtraInitType *), int (*destroy_func)(MutexType *)>
class PThreadMutexWrapper {
public:
    PThreadMutexWrapper() {
        if (0 != init_func(&m_mtx, NULL)) {
            throw std::system_error(errno, std::system_category());
        }
    }
    ~PThreadMutexWrapper() {
        if (0 != destroy_func(&m_mtx)) {
            // doh
        }
    }
    operator MutexType &() { return m_mtx; }
private:
    MutexType m_mtx;
};

template<typename MutexType, int(*lock_func)(MutexType *), int(*unlock_func)(MutexType *)>
class PThreadLockWrapper {
public:
    explicit PThreadLockWrapper(MutexType &mtx)
        : m_mtx(mtx)
    {
        if (0 != lock_func(&m_mtx)) {
            throw std::system_error(errno, std::system_category());
        }
    }

    ~PThreadLockWrapper() {
        if (0 != unlock_func(&m_mtx)) {
            printf("Deleting lock error\n");
        }
    }

private:
    MutexType &m_mtx;
};

typedef PThreadLockWrapper<pthread_mutex_t, pthread_mutex_lock, pthread_mutex_unlock> lock_type;
typedef PThreadMutexWrapper<pthread_mutex_t, pthread_mutexattr_t, pthread_mutex_init, pthread_mutex_destroy> mutex_type;
//typedef PThreadLockWrapper<pthread_rwlock_t, pthread_rwlock_wrlock, pthread_rwlock_unlock> lock_type;
//typedef PThreadMutexWrapper<pthread_rwlock_t, pthread_rwlockattr_t, pthread_rwlock_init, pthread_rwlock_destroy> mutex_type;
//typedef std::mutex mutex_type;
//typedef std::lock_guard<mutex_type> lock_type;

class SignalHandler {
public:
    typedef std::function<void (int)> signal_handler_func_type;

    SignalHandler(int signal, signal_handler_func_type handlerFunc)
        : m_signal(signal)
        , m_readDescriptor(-1)
        , m_writeDescriptor(-1)
    {
        ms_instance = this;

        // Create pipe
        int pipe_fds[2];
        if (pipe(pipe_fds) == 0) {
            m_readDescriptor = pipe_fds[0];
            FixupPipeDescriptor(m_readDescriptor);
            m_writeDescriptor = pipe_fds[1];
            FixupPipeDescriptor(m_writeDescriptor);
        } else {
            throw std::system_error(errno, std::system_category());
        }

        // Launch thread to read signal value from the pipe
        m_signalHandlerThread = std::thread(std::bind(signal_handler_thread_main, m_readDescriptor, std::move(handlerFunc)));

        // Install signal handler
        struct sigaction sa;
        memset(&sa, 0, sizeof(sa));
        sa.sa_handler = signal_handler_func;
        sigfillset(&sa.sa_mask);
        sa.sa_flags |= SA_RESTART; // Restart interrupted reads

        if (sigaction(signal, &sa, 0) == -1) {
            throw std::system_error(errno, std::system_category());
        }
    }

    ~SignalHandler() {
        Stop();
    }

    void Stop() {
        // Uninstall signal handler
        struct sigaction sa;
        memset(&sa, 0, sizeof(sa));
        sa.sa_handler = SIG_DFL;
        if (sigaction(m_signal, &sa, 0) != 0) {
            // Ignore/abort...
        }

        // Close pipe
        if (m_readDescriptor != -1) {
            ::close(m_readDescriptor);
            m_readDescriptor = -1;
        }
        if (m_writeDescriptor != -1) {
            ::close(m_writeDescriptor);
            m_writeDescriptor = -1;
        }
        if (m_signalHandlerThread.joinable()) {
            m_signalHandlerThread.join();
        }
    }

private:

    static void FixupPipeDescriptor(int fd)
    {
        // Close on exec
        fcntl(fd, F_SETFD, FD_CLOEXEC);
        // Make non-blocking
        int flags = fcntl(fd, F_GETFL);
        flags |= O_NONBLOCK;
        fcntl(fd, F_SETFL, flags);
    }

    static void signal_handler_thread_main(int readDescriptor, const signal_handler_func_type &handlerFunc)
    {
        // Build set of file descriptors to watch
        fd_set readDescriptors;
        FD_ZERO(&readDescriptors);
        FD_SET(readDescriptor, &readDescriptors);

        int nfds = readDescriptor + 1;

        while (true) {
            // Wait until the read descriptor is ready
            int ret = select(nfds, &readDescriptors, NULL, NULL, NULL);

            if (ret == -1) {
                int err = errno;
                if (EINTR == err) {
                    // interrupted
                    continue;
                } else if (EBADF != err) {
                    printf("Failed to get signal: %d.\n", err);
                }
                break;
            }

            int sig;
            ret = read(readDescriptor, &sig, sizeof(int));

            if (ret == -1) {
                int err = errno;
                if (EAGAIN == err) {
                    // Nothing to read.
                    continue;
                } else {
                    if (EBADF != err) {
                        printf("Failed to read from signal pipe: %d.\n", err);
                    }
                    break;
                }
            }

            handlerFunc(sig);
        }
    }

    static void signal_handler_func(int signal)
    {
        // Store current errno, in case our write changes it
        int storedErrno = errno;

        // Try to write the signal number to the pipe for handling in other thread
        int ret = write(ms_instance->m_writeDescriptor, &signal, sizeof(signal));
        if (ret == -1 && errno != EAGAIN)
        {
            // call aunt Sally.
        }

        // Restore existing errno
        errno = storedErrno;
    }

    static SignalHandler *ms_instance;

    int m_signal;
    int m_readDescriptor;
    int m_writeDescriptor;
    std::thread m_signalHandlerThread;
};

SignalHandler *SignalHandler::ms_instance = NULL;

} // end namespace
share|improve this question
    
You have lock_type lock(mtx) inside your signal handler. Is that not locking the mutex ? (Please be aware that you cannot lock mutexes/rwlocks inside a signal handler. You can't even use printf() like you do. Doing so can lead to a deadlock.) –  nos Mar 25 '14 at 19:27
    
@nos: The actual signal handler function is SignalHandler::signal_handler_func. It only calls write() on a pipe. The lock you are referring to is then called in a separate thread, that listens on that pipe. As stated in the question. –  villintehaspam Mar 25 '14 at 21:57

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