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Is there a way in Bash shell scripting so that I can convert a string into lower case string?

For example,

if $a = "Hi all"

I want to convert it to

$a = "hi all"
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14 Answers 14

up vote 520 down vote accepted

The are various ways:

tr

$ echo $a | tr '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]'
hi all

AWK

$ echo $a | awk '{print tolower($0)}'
hi all

Bash 4.0

$ echo ${a,,}
hi all

Perl

$ echo $a | perl -ne 'print lc'
hi all

Bash

lc(){
    case "$1" in
        [A-Z])
        n=$(printf "%d" "'$1")
        n=$((n+32))
        printf \\$(printf "%o" $n)
    esac
}
word="ABX"
for((i=0;i<${#word};i++))
do
    ch=${word:$i:1}
    lc $ch
done
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3  
Am I missing something, or does your last example (in Bash) actually do something completely different? It works for "ABX", but if you instead make word="Hi All" like the other examples, it returns ha, not hi all. It only works for the capitalized letters and skips the already-lowercased letters. –  jangosteve Jan 14 '12 at 21:58
6  
Note that only the tr and awk examples are specified in the POSIX standard. –  Richard Hansen Feb 3 '12 at 18:55
91  
tr '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]' will use the current locale to determine uppercase/lowercase equivalents, so it'll work with locales that use letters with diacritical marks. –  Richard Hansen Feb 3 '12 at 18:58
2  
How does one get the output into a new variable? Ie say I want the lowercased string into a new variable? –  Adam Parkin Sep 25 '12 at 18:01
17  
@Adam: b="$(echo $a | tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]')" –  Tino Nov 14 '12 at 15:39

In Bash 4:

To lowercase

$ string="A FEW WORDS"
$ echo ${string,}
a FEW WORDS
$ echo ${string,,}
a few words
$ echo ${string,,[AEIUO]}
a FeW WoRDS

$ string="A Few Words"
$ declare -l string
$ string=$string; echo $string
a few words

To uppercase

$ string="a few words"
$ echo ${string^}
A few words
$ echo ${string^^}
A FEW WORDS
$ echo ${string^^[aeiou]}
A fEw wOrds

$ string="A Few Words"
$ declare -u string
$ string=$string; echo $string
A FEW WORDS

Toggle (undocumented)

$ string="A Few Words"
$ echo ${string~~}
a fEW wORDS
$ string="A FEW WORDS"
$ echo ${string~}
a fEW wORDS
$ string="a few words"
$ echo ${string~}
A Few Words

Capitalize (undocumented)

$ string="a few words"
$ declare -c string
$ string=$string
$ echo $string
A few words

Title case:

$ string="a few words"
$ string=($string)
$ string=${string[@]^}
$ echo $string
A Few Words

$ declare -c string
$ string=(a few words)
$ echo ${string[@]}
A Few Words

To turn off a declare attribute, use +. For example, declare +c string. This affects subsequent assignments and not the current value.

Edit:

Added "toggle first character by word" (${var~}) as suggested by ghostdog74.

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4  
there's also ${string~} –  ghostdog74 Feb 15 '10 at 10:52
3  
Quite bizzare, "^^" and ",," operators don't work on non-ASCII characters but "~~" does... So string="łódź"; echo ${string~~} will return "ŁÓDŹ", but echo ${string^^} returns "łóDź". Even in LC_ALL=pl_PL.utf-8. That's using bash 4.2.24. –  Hubert Kario Jul 12 '12 at 16:48
2  
@HubertKario: That's weird. It's the same for me in Bash 4.0.33 with the same string in en_US.UTF-8. It's a bug and I've reported it. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 12 '12 at 18:20
1  
@HubertKario: Try echo "$string" | tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]'. It will probably exhibit the same failure. So the problem is at least partly not Bash's. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 13 '12 at 0:44
3  
@HubertKario: The Bash maintainer has acknowledged the bug and stated that it will be fixed in the next release. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 14 '12 at 14:27
echo "Hi All" | tr "[:upper:]" "[:lower:]"
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for not assuming english –  Richard Hansen Feb 3 '12 at 19:00
4  
@RichardHansen: tr doesn't work for me for non-ACII characters. I do have correct locale set and locale files generated. Have any idea what could I be doing wrong? –  Hubert Kario Jul 12 '12 at 16:56
    
FYI: This worked on Windows/Msys. Some of the other suggestions did not. –  wasatchwizard yesterday

tr:

a="$(tr [A-Z] [a-z] <<< "$a")"

AWK:

{ print tolower($0) }

sed:

y/ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ/abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz/
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1  
+1 a="$(tr [A-Z] [a-z] <<< "$a")" looks easiest to me. I am still a beginner... –  Sandeepan Nath Feb 2 '11 at 11:12
4  
+1 I am now able to save the result to a freakin variable! –  Mazyod Mar 10 '12 at 20:39
    
I strongly recommend the sed solution; I've been working in an environment that for some reason doesn't have tr but I've yet to find a system without sed, plus a lot of the time I want to do this I've just done something else in sed anyway so can chain the commands together into a single (long) statement. –  Haravikk Oct 19 '13 at 12:54
    
The bracket expressions should be quoted. In tr [A-Z] [a-z] A, the shell may perform filename expansion if there are filenames consisting of a single letter or nullgob is set. tr "[A-Z]" "[a-z]" A will behave properly. –  Dennis Nov 6 '13 at 19:49
1  
@CamiloMartin it's a BusyBox system where I'm having that problem, specifically Synology NASes, but I've encountered it on a few other systems too. I've been doing a lot of cross-platform shell scripting lately, and with the requirement that nothing extra be installed it makes things very tricky! However I've yet to encounter a system without sed –  Haravikk Jun 15 at 10:51

In zsh:

echo $a:u

Gotta love zsh!

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2  
or $a:l for lower case conversion –  Scott Smedley Jan 27 '11 at 5:39

For a standard shell (without bashisms) using only builtins:

uppers=ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
lowers=abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

lc(){ #usage: lc "SOME STRING" -> "some string"
    i=0
    while ([ $i -lt ${#1} ]) do
        CUR=${1:$i:1}
        case $uppers in
            *$CUR*)CUR=${uppers%$CUR*};OUTPUT="${OUTPUT}${lowers:${#CUR}:1}";;
            *)OUTPUT="${OUTPUT}$CUR";;
        esac
        i=$((i+1))
    done
    echo "${OUTPUT}"
}

And for upper case:

uc(){ #usage: uc "some string" -> "SOME STRING"
    i=0
    while ([ $i -lt ${#1} ]) do
        CUR=${1:$i:1}
        case $lowers in
            *$CUR*)CUR=${lowers%$CUR*};OUTPUT="${OUTPUT}${uppers:${#CUR}:1}";;
            *)OUTPUT="${OUTPUT}$CUR";;
        esac
        i=$((i+1))
    done
    echo "${OUTPUT}"
}
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Regular expression

I would like to take credit for the command I wish to share but the truth is I obtained it for my own use from http://commandlinefu.com. It has the advantage that if you cd to any directory within your own home folder that is it will change all files and folders to lower case recursively please use with caution. It is a brilliant command line fix and especially useful for those multitudes of albums you have stored on your drive.

find . -depth -exec rename 's/(.*)\/([^\/]*)/$1\/\L$2/' {} \;

You can specify a directory in place of the dot(.) after the find which denotes current directory or full path.

I hope this solution proves useful the one thing this command does not do is replace spaces with underscores - oh well another time perhaps.

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1  
thanks for commandlinefu.com –  Wadih M. Nov 29 '11 at 1:31
    
This didn't work for me for whatever reason, though it looks fine. I did get this to work as an alternative though: find . -exec /bin/bash -c 'mv {} `tr [A-Z] [a-z] <<< {}`' \; –  John Rix Jun 26 '13 at 15:58

I know this is an oldish post but I made this answer for another site so I thought I'd post it up here:

UPPER -> lower: use python:

b=`echo "print '$a'.lower()" | python`

Or Ruby:

b=`echo "print '$a'.downcase" | ruby`

Or Perl (probably my favorite):

b=`perl -e "print lc('$a');"`

Or PHP:

b=`php -r "print strtolower('$a');"`

Or Awk:

b=`echo "$a" | awk '{ print tolower($1) }'`

Or Sed:

b=`echo "$a" | sed 's/./\L&/g'`

Or Bash 4:

b=${a,,}

Or NodeJS if you have it (and are a bit nuts...):

b=`echo "console.log('$a'.toLowerCase());" | node`

You could also use dd (but I wouldn't!):

b=`echo "$a" | dd  conv=lcase 2> /dev/null`

lower -> UPPER:

use python:

b=`echo "print '$a'.upper()" | python`

Or Ruby:

b=`echo "print '$a'.upcase" | ruby`

Or Perl (probably my favorite):

b=`perl -e "print uc('$a');"`

Or PHP:

b=`php -r "print strtoupper('$a');"`

Or Awk:

b=`echo "$a" | awk '{ print toupper($1) }'`

Or Sed:

b=`echo "$a" | sed 's/./\U&/g'`

Or Bash 4:

b=${a^^}

Or NodeJS if you have it (and are a bit nuts...):

b=`echo "console.log('$a'.toUpperCase());" | node`

You could also use dd (but I wouldn't!):

b=`echo "$a" | dd  conv=ucase 2> /dev/null`

Also when you say 'shell' I'm assuming you mean bash but if you can use zsh it's as easy as

b=$a:l

for lower case and

b=$a:u

for upper case.

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In bash 4 you can use typeset

Example:

A="HELLO WORLD"
typeset -l A=$A
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Using GNU sed:

sed 's/.*/\L&/'

Example:

$ foo="Some STRIng";
$ foo=$(echo $foo | sed 's/.*/\L&/')
$ echo $foo 
some string
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For Bash versions earlier than 4.0, this version should be fastest (as it doesn't fork/exec any commands):

function string.monolithic.tolower
{
   local __word=$1
   local __len=${#__word}
   local __char
   local __octal
   local __decimal
   local __result

   for (( i=0; i<__len; i++ ))
   do
      __char=${__word:$i:1}
      case "$__char" in
         [A-Z] )
            printf -v __decimal '%d' "'$__char"
            printf -v __octal '%03o' $(( $__decimal ^ 0x20 ))
            printf -v __char \\$__octal
            ;;
      esac
      __result+="$__char"
   done
   REPLY="$__result"
}

technosaurus's answer had potential too, although it did run properly for mee.

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Pre Bash 4.0

Bash Lower the Case of a string and assign to variable

VARIABLE=$(echo "$VARIABLE" | tr '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]') 

echo $VARIABLE
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If using v4, this is baked-in. If not, here is a simple, widely applicable solution. Other answers (and comments) on this thread were quite helpful in creating the code below.

# Like echo, but converts to lowercase
echolcase () {
    tr [:upper:] [:lower:] <<< "${*}"
}

# Takes one arg by reference (var name) and makes it lowercase
lcase () { 
    eval "${1}"=\'$(echo ${!1//\'/"'\''"} | tr [:upper:] [:lower:] )\'
}

Notes:

  • Doing: a="Hi All" and then: lcase a will do the same thing as: a=$( echolcase "Hi All" )
  • In the lcase function, using ${!1//\'/"'\''"} instead of ${!1} allows this to work even when the string has quotes.
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Using Korn shell (ksh) typeset:

$ echo $SHELL
/usr/bin/ksh
$ typeset -l test_var
$ test_var='HELLO theRE'
$ echo $test_var
hello there
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