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I have a query that is taking a long time and wanted to present it here in the hopes that I've missed something - here is the query (it's basically saying "give me all the funds that have at least one position")

SELECT org_name.legacy_id,
       org_name.                       name,
       org_desc.description,
       org_name.instrument_style_code,
       org_name.investment_orientation,
       org_name.is_active,
       org_name.organization_id,
       mgr_org.eng_name                as manager_name,
       mgrs.manager_org_id             as manager_organization_id,
       mgrs.manager_legacy_id          as manager_legacy_id
  FROM ownership_organization_names org_name
 INNER JOIN (SELECT fund.legacy_id
               FROM ownership_organization_names fund
              INNER JOIN ownership_ownerships own
                 ON fund.legacy_id = own.legacy_id
               LEFT JOIN ownership_unconsolidated_holding_positions pos
                 ON own.ownership_id = pos.ownership_id
              GROUP BY fund.legacy_id
             HAVING COUNT(pos.holding_position_id) > 0) funds_with_positions
    ON funds_with_positions.legacy_id = org_name.legacy_id
  LEFT JOIN ownership_organization_descriptions org_desc
    on org_name.legacy_id = org_desc.legacy_id
  LEFT JOIN ownership_fund_mgrs mgrs
    on org_name.legacy_id = mgrs.fund_legacy_id
  LEFT JOIN organization mgr_org
    on mgr_org.id = mgrs.manager_org_id

The inner query is taking 42 seconds duration and 320 seconds fetch time (doesn't sound right!) and returns 135,683 rows.

The entire query takes 372 seconds duration and 2 seconds fetch (that definitely doesn't sound right)

Here is the explain from the query (350 seconds duration) and apologies for formatting (or lack of)

1   PRIMARY <derived2>  ALL                 135683  
1   PRIMARY org_name    ref PRIMARY PRIMARY 8   funds_with_positions.legacy_id  22303   
1   PRIMARY org_desc    eq_ref  PRIMARY PRIMARY 8   funds_with_positions.legacy_id  1   
1   PRIMARY mgrs    ref PRIMARY PRIMARY 8   people_directory.org_name.legacy_id 665 
1   PRIMARY mgr_org eq_ref  PRIMARY PRIMARY 8   people_directory.mgrs.manager_org_id    1   
2   DERIVED fund    index   PRIMARY PRIMARY 16      46728   Using index
2   DERIVED own ref legacy_id_idx   legacy_id_idx   9   people_directory.fund.legacy_id 15  Using where
2   DERIVED pos ref ownership_id_idx    ownership_id_idx    9   people_directory.own.ownership_id   3

I've indexed every join column and got a huge performance boost by moving the sub-query into the INNER JOIN instead of a WHERE.

I also tried creating an indexed temp table and joining on it but I found that it took like 360 seconds to populate it - the outer join on it however then became trivial (like 1 second) which tells me the inner query is horribly un-optimized but I'm not sure what I can do to further optimize it

I also come from a Microsoft SQL background but assume all other principles are the same. I've seen various threads discuss changing the database storage engine and tweaking buffer sizes, but I'd like to see if I've exhausted every possibility of optimizing the query itself before resorting to such measures

UPDATE: Ultimately the biggest performance increase came from the observation that I had an unnecessary join within my inner-query which cut it down from ~360 seconds to ~70 seconds. However, attempting some of the other logically equivalent optimization techniques yielded some interesting quirks:

As suggested, I tried:

SELECT 
    org_name.legacy_id,
    org_name.`name`,
    org_desc.description,
    org_name.instrument_style_code,
    org_name.investment_orientation,
    org_name.is_active,
    org_name.organization_id,
    mgr_org.eng_name as manager_name,
    mgrs.manager_org_id as manager_organization_id,
    mgrs.manager_legacy_id as manager_legacy_id
FROM ownership_organization_names org_name
INNER JOIN (SELECT own.legacy_id
  FROM ownership_ownerships own 
  WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1
                FROM ownership_unconsolidated_holding_positions pos
                WHERE own.ownership_id = pos.ownership_id)
 ) funds_with_positions ON funds_with_positions.legacy_id = org_name.legacy_id
LEFT JOIN ownership_organization_descriptions org_desc on org_name.legacy_id = org_desc.legacy_id
LEFT JOIN ownership_fund_mgrs mgrs on org_name.legacy_id = mgrs.fund_legacy_id
LEFT JOIN organization mgr_org on mgr_org.id = mgrs.manager_org_id

The MySQL Workbench reported that the query duration took 242.422 seconds with the fetch portion timing out and the client returning an error "Error Code: 2008 MySQL client ran out of memory"

Moving the WHERE EXISTS style sub-query into the WHERE clause did eventually return however it took 0.234 seconds duration / 157.781 seconds fetch. I suspect this is not accurate at all

I'm curious as to the thinking behind this optimization approach of moving the derived table into the WHERE clause as a sub-query - wouldn't INNER JOIN-ing it earlier in the derived table reduce the result set earlier in the query as opposed to later in the WHERE clause?

Granted I confess I am not familiar with the WHERE EXISTS operator, or at least I never think to use it often - what are the implications of it with regards to performance / memory usage vs the sub-query / derived table approach I originally had?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Focusing on the subquery:

     (SELECT fund.legacy_id
      FROM ownership_organization_names fund INNER JOIN
           ownership_ownerships own
           ON fund.legacy_id = own.legacy_id LEFT JOIN
           ownership_unconsolidated_holding_positions pos
           ON own.ownership_id = pos.ownership_id
      GROUP BY fund.legacy_id
      HAVING COUNT(pos.holding_position_id) > 0
     ) funds_with_positions

I observer that fund is not needed. You can just use own.legacy_id. And, the left outer join is unnecessary. You are just looking for matches. This simplifies the query to:

     (SELECT own.legacy_id
      FROM ownership_ownerships own JOIN
           ownership_unconsolidated_holding_positions pos
           ON own.ownership_id = pos.ownership_id
      GROUP BY own.legacy_id
      HAVING COUNT(*) > 0
     ) funds_with_positions

This query requires explicit aggregation, which can be expensive. I'd be inclined to try the following for performance:

     (SELECT own.legacy_id
      FROM ownership_ownerships own 
      WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1
                    FROM ownership_unconsolidated_holding_positions pos
                    WHERE own.ownership_id = pos.ownership_id
                   )
     ) funds_with_positions

This entire subquery is just being used as a filter. So, my final advice is to remove the subquery altogether and include the following where clause:

WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1
              FROM ownership_ownerships own 
              WHERE own.legacy_id = orgname.legacy_id AND
                    EXISTS (SELECT 1
                            FROM ownership_unconsolidated_holding_positions pos
                            WHERE own.ownership_id = pos.ownership_id
                           )
             ) 

I am assuming that the tables all have the correct indexes for processing. For piece, you want indexes on ownership_unconsolidated_holding_positions(ownership_id) and ownership_ownerships(legacy_id, ownership_id).

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent observation with regards to the additional, unnecessary join on the inner-query, that alone yielded a nice boost! However, the WHERE EXISTS approach yielded some interesting quirks (I've added to my original question at the end) and was hoping you could help provide some insight onto the behavior of this operator with regards to performance –  manning18 Mar 27 at 15:29
    
@manning18 . . . The intention was for the where exists to go into the outermost query, not in a subquery. –  Gordon Linoff Mar 27 at 16:20
    
Sorry I should've mentioned that I moved the WHERE EXISTS into the outer-query but it took roughly 160 seconds. In the modified answer I showed the WHERE EXISTS in the inner query because it gave an out-of-memory exception from MySQL WorkBench which I was more curious about in terms of what the implications were that caused it –  manning18 Mar 27 at 18:01

Assuming pos.holding_position_id isn't NULLable the COUNT(pos.holding_position_id) > 0 will return whenever there is matching record in ownership_unconsolidated_holding_positions, so you shouldn't really use a LEFT OUTER JOIN but explicitly rely on the JOIN as it will filter out things earlier in the game. As the description of your question already states, the sub-query is merely used to find out if there is a fund available for a given organization. Sounds to me you could then better use the much more readable WHERE EXISTS(). Added bonus is that you no longer need to aggregate the lookup any more to avoid doubles. Also, the aliases fund and org_name both refer to the same table. Is this on purpose as multiple records can have the same legacy_id? (quite possible!) Or will both always refer to the same record? If the latter is true you could probably optimize the query even further.

SELECT org_name.legacy_id,
       org_name.                       name,
       org_desc.description,
       org_name.instrument_style_code,
       org_name.investment_orientation,
       org_name.is_active,
       org_name.organization_id,
       mgr_org.eng_name                as manager_name,
       mgrs.manager_org_id             as manager_organization_id,
       mgrs.manager_legacy_id          as manager_legacy_id
  FROM ownership_organization_names org_name
  LEFT JOIN ownership_organization_descriptions org_desc
    on org_name.legacy_id = org_desc.legacy_id
  LEFT JOIN ownership_fund_mgrs mgrs
    on org_name.legacy_id = mgrs.fund_legacy_id
  LEFT JOIN organization mgr_org
    on mgr_org.id = mgrs.manager_org_id
 WHERE EXISTS ( SELECT *
                  FROM ownership_organization_names fund
                  JOIN ownership_ownerships own
                    ON fund.legacy_id = own.legacy_id
                  JOIN ownership_unconsolidated_holding_positions pos
                    ON own.ownership_id = pos.ownership_id
                 WHERE funds.legacy_id = org_name.legacy_id )
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