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Suppose I have the following:

char *a = "Learning CPP";
char *b = "Learning CPP";

Can I say that the total memory used was sizeof (a) and not 2*sizeof (stringliteral) ?

Cause my understanding of String literals is that one copy of the string is stored. But however,

Isn't it stored in between a, a+1, a+2 ..... a + 12 address in memory and also b, b + 1, b + 2 ... b + 12 in memory (12 is sizeof string)?

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The variables a and b hold addresses. If they're the same or not depends on the compiler (the C Standard imposes nothing -- don't know about C++) –  pmg Mar 25 at 23:00
    
C++ Standard also imposes nothing. VC++ can do either, depending on your compiler options. (This is aside from the fact that the variables must be const char* in C++) –  Mooing Duck Mar 25 at 23:08
3  
Sizeof(a) gives the size of the pointer named a, not the size of the thing to which it points. –  Fred Mar 25 at 23:08
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"The compiler is allowed, but not required, to merge string literals. That means that identical string literals may or may not compare equal when compared by pointer. Even whether the expression "foo" == "foo" returns true is implementation-defined." en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/string_literal –  evpo Mar 25 at 23:11
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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

How can I find the address of a string literal ?

You have found the address of a string literal. The value of a string literal is the address of its first character. You assigned that value to a and b.

Can I say that the total memory used was sizeof (a) and not 2*sizeof (a) ?

First off the question is malformed. sizeof(a) is the size of the pointer.

You intended to ask:

Can I say that the total memory used for the string literals is the size required for one copy of the string, and not the size required for two copies of the string?

No. That's an implementation detail of the compiler. It may choose to intern the strings or not at its whim. If you modify one of the strings, it is implementation-defined whether the other string is observed to be modified.

This is a consequence of the more general fact that if you modify one of the strings, it is implementation-defined what happens, period. Anything can happen.

my understanding of string literals is that one copy of the string is stored.

Your understanding is mistaken. That is not a guarantee of the language. That's an optimization that a compiler can choose to make or not.

Isn't it stored in between a, a+1, a+2 ..... a + 12 address in memory and also b, b + 1, b + 2 ... b + 12 in memory (12 is sizeof string)?

I cannot understand this question. What is the "it" that isn't being stored?

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Thanks for the answer. By it I meant the string. And it so happens that a == b. So I'm clear on it now. –  shrinidhisondur Mar 25 at 23:09
    
It is possible you did indeed mean to write "value", but I think you meant "address" there. –  Mooing Duck Mar 25 at 23:09
    
@MooingDuck: I assure you I did not. We have here an assignment to a variable. An assignment converts the value of the right hand operand to the type of the left hand operand and then makes the assignment of the converted value. The question then is what is the value of the right hand operand? And the answer is: the address of the first character of the string. –  Eric Lippert Mar 26 at 13:52
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The following code will show you where the variables are and where the strings are

printf( "variable a is at address %p\n", &a );
printf( "variable b is at address %p\n", &b );
printf( "the string that a points to is at address %p\n", a );
printf( "the string that b points to is at address %p\n", b );

Note that the last two lines may or may not print the same address, depending on the compiler. There is no requirement that the compiler create only one string.

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You can check it yourself. For example

if ( a == b ) std::cout << "The string literals are coinside" << std::endl;
else std::cout << "The string literals occupy different areas of memory" << std::endl;

Usually compilers have options that allow to control wjhether two identical string literals will occupy the same memory or each literal will be allocated in its own area of memory.

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Yes. They do. Thanks. I don't know why I didn't think of this myself. –  shrinidhisondur Mar 25 at 23:05
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Can I say that the total memory used was sizeof (a) and not 2*sizeof (a) ? --> No, sizeof(a) is sizeof(char *) = 4

Isn't it stored in between a, a+1, a+2 ..... a + 12 address in memory and also b, b + 1, b + 2 ... b + 12 in memory (12 is sizeof string)? --> Using the gcc compiler, when the strings are equal, a and b are the same address. When the strings are different, I find different a and b are different addresses. (hey, this was a fun exercise..I learned something new)

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