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It runs well, but if I delete the third line in main() "printf("(main)s: %s\n",s);

The output encounters a decode error: it print unrecognized chars instead of helo world.

Here is my code :

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdarg.h>
void fun1(int i, ...){
    va_list arg_ptr; 
    char *s=NULL; 

    va_start(arg_ptr, i); 
    s=va_arg(arg_ptr, char*); 
    va_end(arg_ptr); 
    printf("address of s in fun1: %x\n",&(*s));
    printf("(fun1)s: %s\n",s); 
    return; 
}
void main(){
    char *s = "hello world";
    printf("        address of s: %x\n",&s);
    printf("(main)s: %s\n",s);
    fun1(4);
}

How can i fix this ?

share|improve this question
    
You need anything more, or you gonna accept an answer? That would be polite, and give you some more reputation too... –  Deduplicator Mar 29 '14 at 0:14
    
@Deduplicator,I am sorry for not accepting any answer. Thank you for your help! So to print the address of a variable, %p is expected. –  wangmanxf Mar 29 '14 at 13:53
    
Right. Just remember that only char* and void* can be printed. All others have to be explicitly converted by you before. –  Deduplicator Mar 29 '14 at 13:55
    
@Deduplicator, I have also found the reason why I got some decode error in va_list parsing. The parameters of functions called in main() are pushed to stack, including fun1(), when I call in fun1(4), and parsing parameters with va_list, parameters of printf() just before fun1() could be parsed too. And when printf("(main)s: %s\n",s) [1] kept, s(in fun1()) will be pointed to the string pointed by s(in [1]), otherwise, s(in fun1()) will be pointed to &s(which is not defined) and a decode error occures. Am I right ? –  wangmanxf Mar 29 '14 at 14:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Seems you love UB.

  1. %x is not for printing pointers. Use %p (but only for printing void* or char*).
  2. You are taking the first var_arg_parameter, but you didn't pass one.
  3. Unless you are in a freestanding environment (microcontroller or such), you have a bad prototype for main. Use int main() or int main(int argc, char** argv).

In addition, you probably want to print s resp. the param you passed, not where it's stored.

Added for clarification: UB means Undefined Behavior, an acronym any C / C++ programmer should know by heart. It literally means, "This program can exhibit any behavior whatsoever, including making demons fly out of your nose." What actually happens in any specific instance can be completely unpredictable and change at the drop of a hat.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdarg.h>
void fun1(int i, ...){
    va_list arg_ptr; 
    char *s; /* removed superfluous initialisation */

    va_start(arg_ptr, i); 
    s=va_arg(arg_ptr, char*); 
    va_end(arg_ptr); 
    printf("address of s in fun1: %p\n",(void*)&s);
    printf("value of s in fun1: %p\n",s);
    printf("address of string s: %p\n",s);
    printf("value of string s: %s\n",s); 
    return; 
}
int main(){
    char *s = "hello world";
    printf("address of s in main: %p\n",(void*)&s);
    printf("value of s in main: %p\n",s);
    printf("address of string s: %p\n",s);
    printf("value of string s: %s\n",s); 
    fun1(4, s); /* fun1 will always access the first var-arg parameter as a string, so you must provide it */
    return 0; /* can be omitted but only for main, so why do it? */
}
share|improve this answer
    
1. ("%x",&s) not ("%x",s) –  wangmanxf Mar 26 '14 at 5:58
    
1. ("%x",&s) not ("%x",s) 2. I know this problem. The output is like: ############################### address of s: bfe445fc (main)s: hello world address of s in fun1: bfe445c8 (fun1)s: hello world ############################### But if I delete the second printf() in main(), then output is like: ############################### address of s: bfbb47dc address of s in fun1: bfbb47a8 (fun1)s: ���� ############################### 3. Thank you for your advice. I will take it. –  wangmanxf Mar 26 '14 at 6:10
    
@wangmanxf, you do realize that &s means char** which is a pointer right? and that's the reason why deduplicator is telling you that you should use %p to print a pointer since in fact, you are using &s. what does 1. ("%x",&s) not ("%x",s) have to do with anything? –  Claudiordgz Mar 26 '14 at 6:24
    
I have got a little confused about address of variable s and address of the string pointed by s. I want to print address of the string pointed by s. So in main(), modified printf("address of string pointed by s: %p\n",&(*s)); //modified printf("address of s: %p\n",&s); //added a new line And in fun1(), modified printf("address of string pointed by s in fun1: %p\n",&(*s)); //modified –  wangmanxf Mar 26 '14 at 7:36
    
I got output like address of string pointed by s: 0x80485f1 address of s: 0xbff225d8 (main)s: hello world address of string pointed by s in fun1: 0x80485f1 (fun1)s: hello world ###But if I delete printf("(main)s: %s\n",s) in main() I got output like address of string pointed by s: 0x80485e1 address of s: 0xbfe9e698 address of string pointed by s in fun1: 0xbfe9e698 (fun1)s: �� ########### –  wangmanxf Mar 26 '14 at 7:39

Because you printf function says %x and not %s The %x is for unsigned hexadecimal integer and the %s is for a string of characters.

warning: format '%x' expects argument of type 'unsigned int', but argument 2 has type 'char**'

To print the address of your char array you could try copying the value of the array to an int variable.

Your problem is

printf("        address of s: %x\n",&s); ///< this line right here

The variable s is a char*, and &s is a char**, using %x you are implicitly casting your char** to int and will be printed in hex.

(ISO/IEC ISO/IEC 9899:1999 (E), §6.3.1.1) [...] If an int can represent all values of the original type, the value is converted to an int; otherwise, it is converted to an unsigned int. These are called the integer promotions.

I heard that you only have a problem when you remove the line: printf("(main)s: %s\n",s);.

So if your char** gets implicitly converted to int or uint and then gets presented in hex who knows what address are you looking at.

You can check everything about how to format printf here

share|improve this answer
    
There are two printf() and the first one prints the address of (char*)s : printf(" address of s: %x",&s), and the second one prints string s. In fun1() it does the same way. I think you have ignored the '&' before s (&s) in printf() –  wangmanxf Mar 26 '14 at 5:56
    
not really, i even pasted the warning regarding the &s, you are passing a char * to %x, the x expects an int, thus since you are passing another thing it warns you of possibly undefined behavior. –  Claudiordgz Mar 26 '14 at 6:12
1  
Using a wrong conversion specifier does not mean you do an implicit cast. It means you are lying to the compiler, so all bets are off. (Might not cause catastrophic breakage in your compiler on your architecture today, worse the luck.) –  Deduplicator Mar 27 '14 at 21:03
    
@wangmanxf, moral of the story, if you code lazy you get probabilistic results, sometimes works and sometimes it doesn't –  Claudiordgz Mar 27 '14 at 21:14

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