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I have the following code, see also live example:

template <typename A, typename B>
using ternary = decltype(true ? std::declval <A>() : std::declval <B>());

template <template <typename, typename> class F>
struct test
{
    template <typename A, typename B, typename T = F <A, B> >
    static std::true_type call(int);

    template <typename A, typename B>
    static std::false_type call(...);
};

template <template <typename, typename> class F, typename A, typename B>
using sfinae = decltype(test <F>::template call <A, B>(0));

template <typename T> struct X { };

template <typename T> struct Y
{
    template <typename A>
    Y(A&& a) { }
};

int main ()
{
    using A = X <int>;
    using B = X <double>;
    using C = Y <int>;
    using D = Y <double>;
    sfinae <ternary, A, B>{};  // OK
    sfinae <ternary, C, D>{};  // GCC error:
           // operands to ?: have different types ‘Y<int>’ and ‘Y<double>’
}

It's the result of extreme simplification of actual code, so don't ask if it's useful. Roughly, sfinae <ternary, A, B> does a pretty much standard SFINAE test on whether one may apply the ternary operator ?: to two arguments of types A, B.

Clang compiles fine. GCC is OK with the first call using class template X but gives an error on the second call using Y. The error indicates that SFINAE fails and the compiler unexpectedly tries to apply the ternary operator, which it shouldn't. SFINAE should never fail (result in a compiler error): it should always compile, returning either true_type or false_type (in this example, it should always return false_type).

The only difference between class templates X, Y is that Y has constructor

template <typename A>
Y(A&& a) { }

In my actual code, there are more constructors and all are equipped with enable_if to allow for disambiguation. To be just a bit more realistic, Y would be

template <typename T> struct Y
{
    using type = T;

    template <
       typename A,
       typename = typename std::enable_if <
          std::is_constructible<T, typename A::type>{}
       >::type
    >
    Y(A&& a) : /*...*/ { }
};

to allow construction by other Y's having different T, but nothing would change with respect to the error. Normally the ternary operator should either fail due to different types or be ambiguous due to the generic constructor (which is the case?) but either way SFINAE should report false_type.

How does this constructor make SFINAE fail? Is GCC compliant here? Any workaround?


EDIT

If I manually instantiate

decltype(true ? std::declval <C>() : std::declval <D>());

in main(), clang says

error: conditional expression is ambiguous; 'Y<int>' can be converted to 'Y<double>'
       and vice versa

while for A, B it says

incompatible operand types ('X<int>' and 'X<double>')

and GCC insists on the same error as above in both cases. I don't know if this may help.

share|improve this question
    
For non-failure combinations, std::common_type is guaranteed to provide the same result type as the ternary operator. Perhaps you could simplify your code using it and effectively work around the questionable GCC behaviour. –  Tony D Mar 26 at 2:07
    
@TonyD Well, I didn't give much background, but for a particular reason, this code is in fact part of an alternative implementation of a slight variant of std::common_type, and uses the ternary operator exactly as std::common_type does. The issue is that at some point I want to know if I can apply the operator and this fails in this particular case. –  iavr Mar 26 at 2:12
    
@TonyD In fact, std::common_type<A, B>{}; compiles here, while std::common_type<C, D>{}; fails the same way, so GCC has exactly the same problem with std::common_type as this code here (I know GCC's implementation, it's not much different). Clang fails in both cases because its own implementation is not "SFINAE-friendly". –  iavr Mar 26 at 2:17
    
It doesn't look like SFINAE. Could you plese eleborate why this substitution should fail? –  AlexT Mar 26 at 2:29
    
why do you use parameter pack notation (typename... A) here? You have only two template arguments –  AlexT Mar 26 at 2:36

2 Answers 2

This sounds a lot like a GCC bug. Using a fairly recent build of GCC 4.9 yields this error instead:

sftern.cpp: In instantiation of ‘struct test<ternary>’:
sftern.cpp:17:57:   required by substitution of ‘template<template<class ...> class F, class ... A> using sfinae = decltype (test:: call<A ...>(0)) [with F = ternary; A = {X<int>, X<double>}]’
sftern.cpp:33:26:   required from here
sftern.cpp:10:27: error: pack expansion argument for non-pack parameter ‘A’ of alias template ‘template<class A, class B> using ternary = decltype ((true ?  declval<A>() : declval<B>()))’
     static std::true_type call(int);
                           ^
sftern.cpp:3:11: note: declared here
 template <typename A, typename B>
           ^

It sounds like the bug you describe has been fixed, but it's still getting tripped up. (There's no problem with expanding a pack into a non-pack, as long as the number of items is correct.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This is in fact a different bug of GCC that breaks out before coming to the error of this question. I will try to update the code in the question to make this go away, then you'll see the actual error. –  iavr Mar 26 at 1:56
    
Code updated: variadic templates switched to binary. This is not generic now but fits this example and should bypass the error you got here. –  iavr Mar 26 at 2:01
    
@iavr Now GCC compiles it without complaint. The bug in question has been fixed. –  Potatoswatter Mar 26 at 2:10
    
Oh, that's great news on one hand, thanks! On the other hand, upgrading GCC just for this is a huge change because I know 4.9.0 has other issues like the one you mentioned, plus it's much slower. I'd rather stay with 4.8.x, so if you have any idea for a workaround, it's welcome :-) –  iavr Mar 26 at 2:25

I've slightly rephrased this example and I've started getting errors in clang:

template <typename A, typename B>
struct ternary1
{
    typedef decltype(true ? std::declval <A>() : std::declval <B>()) type;
};

template <template <typename, typename> class F>
struct test1
{
    template <typename A, typename B, typename T = typename F <A, B>::type >
    static std::true_type call(int);

    template <typename A, typename B>
    static std::false_type call(...);
};

template <template <typename, typename> class F, typename A, typename B>
using sfinae1 = decltype(test1 <F>::template call <A, B>(0));

template <typename T> struct X { };

template <typename T> struct Y
{
    template <typename A>
    Y(A&& a) { }
};

int main ()
{
    using A = X <int>;
    using B = X <double>;
    using C = Y <int>;
    using D = Y <double>;
    sfinae <ternary, A, B>{}; //clang: Incompatible operand types ('X<int>' and 'X<double>')
    sfinae <ternary, C, D>{}; //clang: Conditional expression is ambiguous; 'Y<int>' can be converted to 'Y<double>' and vice versa
}

Is ternary equivalent to typename ternary1::type or I'm missing something?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I am afraid this attempt is not in the right direction. "Substitution failure is not an error" unless substitution triggers an invalid class template instantiation. So given a function with template parameter T you may have e.g. construct typename T::foo anywhere in its declaration, or instead use foo_of<T> where template alias template<typename T> using foo_of = typename T::foo;, but you cannot use typename foo_of_t<T>::type where class template template<typename T> struct foo_of_t { using type = typename T::foo; };. This is an error. –  iavr Mar 26 at 19:07
    
So to answer your question, ternary<A,B> is equivalent to typename ternary1<A,B>::type if ternary<A,B> is valid; otherwise, SFINAE on ternary<A,B> returns false while SFINAE on typename ternary1<A,B>::type yields an error. –  iavr Mar 26 at 19:17
    
Thanks, I've just realised the same. I guess what's happening - gcc treats ternary declaration as template and tries to instantiate it first with provided types (and gets error) –  AlexT Mar 26 at 23:01

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