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I'm having a problem instantiating an anonymous type in my code.

For some reason, TResponse response = default(TResponse); returns null, even though TResponse has a constructor for it.

Am I being dumb?!

Class:

public class MyClass
{
  public MyResponse GetResponse(MyRequest request)
  {
    return Service<MyRequest, MyResponse>.MakeRequest(
      request,
      delegate() {
        return AnotherService.GetRequest(request);
      }
    );
  }
}

Service class

public static class Service<TRequest, TResponse>
  where TRequest : IRequest
  where TResponse : IResponse
{
  public delegate TResponse UseDelegate();

  public TResponse MakeRequest(TRequest request, UseDelegate codeBlock)
  {
    TResponse response = default(TResponse); // <-- Returns nulll

    response = codeBlock();

    return response;
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
You've jumped to conclusions by thinking this has anything to do with anonymous types. You could have confirmed that by substituting some other type that you know has a name. –  Rob Kennedy Feb 15 '10 at 10:33
    
Well, it's anonymous as far as I don't know what type it is. :) –  Dan Atkinson Feb 15 '10 at 10:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As Brandon has said, default returns null for any reference type.

However, I don't see why you're using it at all - the value you've assigned will be overwritten by the return value of codeBlock() anyway. In other words, you can change your MakeRequest method to just:

public TResponse MakeRequest(TRequest request, UseDelegate codeBlock) { TResponse response = codeBlock();

return response;

}

or even:

public TResponse MakeRequest(TRequest request, UseDelegate codeBlock) { return codeBlock(); }

I'm assuming that in reality there's some more code there... but if you really want to call a parameterless constructor, you can constrain TResponse with:

where TResponse : IResponse, new()

and then use:

TResponse response = new TResponse();

That way you'll get a compile-time guarantee that TResponse has a parameterless constructor; just using Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(TResponse)) without a constraint on TResponse would work, but would delay finding out about the problem where you tried to use response type which didn't have a parameterless constructor.

Furthermore, I don't see any anonymous types in your code - the only way an anonymous type would have a parameterless constructor would be if you used:

new {}

which would be somewhat pointless.

share|improve this answer
    
Jon, you are right. There is some logic before the codeblock, but essentially, if I don't add the constructor, then I get problems with using unassigned variables. –  Dan Atkinson Feb 15 '10 at 10:27
    
Jon, thanks for enlightening me. I wasn't aware of the use new(). –  Dan Atkinson Feb 15 '10 at 10:32

If you want to be able to create a new instance of a type parameter you should use the new() generic constrait MSDN.

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you should use new() constraint, and you code will look like this

public static class Service<TRequest, TResponse>
  where TRequest : IRequest
  where TResponse : IResponse, new()
{
  public delegate TResponse UseDelegate();

  public TResponse MakeRequest(TRequest request, UseDelegate codeBlock)
  {
    TResponse response = new TResponse();
    response = codeBlock();

    return response;
  }
}
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For complex types, use the Activator.CreateInstance

So in your example: TResponse response = Activator.CreateInstance<TResponse>();

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1  
Or you could just specify the generic type parameter as where TResponse : IResponse, new(), and then do TResponse response = new TResponse(); –  LukeH Feb 15 '10 at 10:29

default(T) does not call type T's default constructor like one might think. default(T) means null for classes, 0 for primitives, and a value with all fields initialized to null or 0 for structs.

see keyword default

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