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Please have a look at this. The result shows, indeed, a join of two sets. I want the output as following i.e. No Cartesian Product.

ID_1    TYPE_1  NAME_1          ID_2    TYPE_2  NAME_2
===============================================================
TP001   1       Adam Smith      TV001   2       Leon Crowell
TP002   1       Ben Conrad      TV002   2       Chris Hobbs
TP003   1       Lively Jonathan 

I used one of the solution, join, known to me to select rows as columns but i need results in required format while join is not mandatory.

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Down vote without reasoning!!! –  bjan Mar 26 at 6:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need an artificial column as id. Use rownum for that on both types of teachers. Because you do not know if there are more Teachers of type 1 or of Type 2, you must do a full outer join to combine both sets.

SELECT *
  FROM (SELECT ROWNUM AS cnt, teacherid
             , teachertype, teachername
          FROM teachers
         WHERE teachertype = 1) qry1
       FULL OUTER JOIN (SELECT ROWNUM AS cnt, teacherid
                             , teachertype, teachername
                          FROM teachers
                         WHERE teachertype = 2) qry2
          ON qry1.cnt = qry2.cnt

In general, databases think in rows, not in columns. In your example you are lucky - you only have two types of teachers. For every new type of teacher you would have to alter your statement and append a full outer join only to present the output of your query in a special way - one set per column.

But with a simple select you retrive the same Information and it will work regardless how many teacher types you have.

SQL is somewhat limited in presenting data, i would leave that to the client retriving the data or use PL/SQL for a more generic aproach.

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There should be some constraint of keys on which you join table or tables. If there is no constraint it will always result in Cartesian Product i.e number of rows of first table x numbers of rows of second table

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SELECT TONE.TEACHERID ID_1, TONE.TEACHERTYPE TYPE_1, TONE.TEACHERNAME NAME_1
      ,TTWO.TEACHERID ID_2, TTWO.TEACHERTYPE TYPE_2, TTWO.TEACHERNAME NAME_2
FROM 
(SELECT TEACHERID, TEACHERTYPE, TEACHERNAME FROM TEACHERS WHERE TEACHERTYPE = 1)
  TONE
FULL OUTER JOIN
(SELECT TEACHERID, TEACHERTYPE, TEACHERNAME FROM TEACHERS WHERE TEACHERTYPE = 2)
  TTWO
ON TONE.TEACHERID = REPLACE(TTWO.TEACHERID,'TV','TP');

ID_1    TYPE_1  NAME_1          ID_2    TYPE_2  NAME_2
=====   ======  ======          ======  ======  ======
TP001   1       Adam Smith      TV001   2       Leon Crowell
TP002   1       Ben Conrad      TV002   2       Chris Hobbs
TP003   1       Lively Jonathan (null)  (null)  (null)

http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!4/c58f3/28

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