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Recently I read through this Developer Works Document. The document is all about defining hashCode() and equals() effectively and correctly, but I am not able to figure out why we need to override these two methods.

How can I take the decision to implement these method efficiently?

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15 Answers 15

up vote 109 down vote accepted

It is not always necessary to override hashcode and equals. But if you think you need to override one, then you need to override both of them. Let's analyze what whould happen if we override one but not the other and we attempt to use a Map.

Say we have a class like this and that two objects of MyClass are equal if their importantField is equal (with hashCode and equals generated by eclipse)

public class MyClass {

    private final String importantField;
    private final String anotherField;

    public MyClass(final String equalField, final String anotherField) {
        this.importantField = equalField;
        this.anotherField = anotherField;
    }

    public String getEqualField() {
        return importantField;
    }

    public String getAnotherField() {
        return anotherField;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result
                + ((importantField == null) ? 0 : importantField.hashCode());
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(final Object obj) {
        if (this == obj)
            return true;
        if (obj == null)
            return false;
        if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
            return false;
        final MyClass other = (MyClass) obj;
        if (importantField == null) {
            if (other.importantField != null)
                return false;
        } else if (!importantField.equals(other.importantField))
            return false;
        return true;
    }

}

Override only hashCode

Imagine you have this

MyClass first = new MyClass("a","first");
MyClass second = new MyClass("a","second");

If you only override hashCode then when you call myMap.put(first,someValue) it takes first, calculates its hashCode and stores it in a given bucket. Then when you call myMap.put(second,someOtherValue) it should replace first with second as per the Map Documentation because they are equal (according to our definition).

But the problem is that equals was not redefined, so when the map hashes second and iterates through the bucket looking if there is an object k such that second.equals(k) is true it won't find any as second.equals(first) will be false.

Override only equals

If only equals is overriden, then when you call myMap.put(first,someValue) first will hash to some bucket and when you call myMap.put(second,someOtherValue) it will hash to some other bucket (as they have a different hashCode). So, although they are equal, as they don't hash to the same bucket, the map can't realize it and both of them stay in the map.

Hope it was clear

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Thanks for a nice explanation. –  Code Enthusiastic Jul 25 '13 at 17:15
    
can you please elaborate a little more , in second case , why the second object must go in another bucket? –  Hussain Akhtar Wahid 'Ghouri' May 5 at 23:31
    
that was the best explanation of equals and hashcode. I would suggest it will be more appropriate if u mention in code(in comments) that how you actually want this code to work. –  sagar Sep 12 at 5:10

You must override hashCode() in every class that overrides equals(). Failure to do so will result in a violation of the general contract for Object.hashCode(), which will prevent your class from functioning properly in conjunction with all hash-based collections, including HashMap, HashSet, and Hashtable.


   from Effective Java, by Joshua Bloch

By defining equals() and hashCode() consistently, you can improve the usability of your classes as keys in hash-based collections. As the API doc for hashCode explains: "This method is supported for the benefit of hashtables such as those provided by java.util.Hashtable."

The best answer to your question about how to implement these methods efficiently is suggesting you to read Chapter 3 of Effective Java.

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Because if you do not override them you will be use the default implentation in Object.

Given that instance equality and hascode values generally require knowledge of what makes up an object they generally will need to be redefined in your class to have any tangible meaning.

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Simply put, the equals-method in Object check for reference equality, where as two instances of your class could still be semantically equal when the properties are equal. This is for instance important when putting your objects into a container that utilizes equals and hashcode, like HashMap and Set. Let's say we have a class like:

public class Foo {
    String id;
    String whatevs;

    Foo(String id, String whatevs) {
        this.id = id;
        this.whatevs = whatevs;
    }
}

We create two instances with the same id:

Foo a = new Foo("id", "something");
Foo b = new Foo("id", "something else");

Without overriding equals we are getting:

  • a.equals(b) is false because they are two different instances
  • a.equals(a) is true since it's the same instance
  • b.equals(b) is true since it's the same instance

Correct? Well maybe, if this is what you want. But let's say we want objects with the same id to be the same object, regardless if it's two different instances. We override the equals (and hashcode):

public class Foo {
    String id;
    String whatevs;

    Foo(String id, String whatevs) {
        this.id = id;
        this.whatevs = whatevs;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object other) {
        if (other instanceof Foo) {
            return ((Foo)other).id.equals(this.id);   
        }
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return this.id.hashCode();
    }
}

As for implementing equals and hashcode I can recommend using Guava's helper methods

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2  
link unreachable –  mauretto Jun 17 '13 at 14:12

I was looking into the explanation " If you only override hashCode then when you call myMap.put(first,someValue) it takes first, calculates its hashCode and stores it in a given bucket. Then when you call myMap.put(first,someOtherValue) it should replace first with second as per the Map Documentation because they are equal (according to our definition)." :

I think 2nd time when we are adding in myMap then it should be the 'second' object like myMap.put(second,someOtherValue)

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In order to use our own class objects as keys in collections like HashMap, Hashtable etc.. , we should override both methods ( hashCode() and equals() ) by having an awareness on internal working of collection. Otherwise, it leads to wrong results which we are not expected.

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Assume you have class (A) that aggregates two other (B) (C), and you need to store instances of (A) inside hashtable. Default implementation only allows distinguishing of instances, but not by (B) and (C). So two instances of A could be equal, but default wouldn't allow you to compare them in correct way.

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Joshua Bloch said it better than me in Effective Java, so just take a look at it !

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hashCode() :

If you only override hash-code method nothing will happen. Because it always return new hash-code for each object as an Object class.

equals() :

If you only override equal method, a.equals(b) is true it means the hash-code of a and b must be same but not happen. Because you did not override hash-code method.

Note : hash-code() method of Object class always return new hash-code for each object.

So when you need to use your object in the hashing based collection, must override both equals() and hash-code().

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It is useful when using Value Objects. The following is an excerpt from the Portland Pattern Repository:

Examples of value objects are things like numbers, dates, monies and strings. Usually, they are small objects which are used quite widely. Their identity is based on their state rather than on their object identity. This way, you can have multiple copies of the same conceptual value object.

So I can have multiple copies of an object that represents the date 16 Jan 1998. Any of these copies will be equal to each other. For a small object such as this, it is often easier to create new ones and move them around rather than rely on a single object to represent the date.

A value object should always override .equals() in Java (or = in Smalltalk). (Remember to override .hashCode() as well.)

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Both the methods are defined in Object class. And both are in its simplest implementation. So when you need you want add some more implementation to these methods then you have override in your class.

For Ex: eqauls() method in object only checks its equality on the reference. So if you need compare its state as well then you can override that as it is done in String class.

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The methods equals and hashcode are defined in the object class. By default if the equals method returns true, then the system will go further and check the value of the hash code. If the hash code of the 2 objects is also same only then the objects will be considered as same. So if you override only equals method, then even though the overridden equals method indicates 2 objects to be equal , the system defined hashcode may not indicate that the 2 objects are equal. So we need to override hash code as well.

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If the equals method returns true, there's no need to check the hashcode. If two objects have different hashcodes, however, one should be able to regard them as different without having to call equals. Further, knowledge that none of the things on a list have a particular hash code implies that none of the things on the list can match nay object with that hash code. As a simple example, if one has a list of objects whose hash codes are even numbers, and a list of objects where they are odd numbers, no object whose hash code is an even number will be in the second list. –  supercat Jul 28 '13 at 19:13
    
If one had two objects X and Y whose "equals" methods indicated they matched, but X's hash code was an even number and Y's hash code was an odd number, a collection as described above which noted that object Y's hash code was odd and stored it on the second list would not be able to find a match for object X. It would observe that X's hash code was even, and since the second list doesn't have any objects with even-numbered hash codes, it wouldn't bother to search there for something that matches X, even though Y would match X. What you should say... –  supercat Jul 28 '13 at 19:17
    
...would be that many collections will avoid comparing things whose hash codes would imply that they cannot be equal. Given two objects whose hash codes are unknown, it is often faster to compare them directly than compute their hash codes, so there's no guarantee that things which report unequal hash codes but return true for equals will not be regarded as matching. On the other hand, if collections happen notice that things cannot have the same hash code, they're likely not to notice that they're equal. –  supercat Jul 28 '13 at 19:20

Please check the below link for proper and easy explanation: http://javapapers.com/core-java/hashcode-and-equals-methods-override/

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Java puts a rule that

"If two objects are equal using Object class equals method, then the hashcode method should give the same value for these two objects."

So, if in our class we override equals we should override hashcode method also to fallow this rule. These both methods equals and hashcode are used in Hashtable to store values as key-value pair.If we do override one and not the other , there is a possibility that the hashtable may not work as we want, if we use such object as key.

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