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I have an array of length 0, and for whatever reason I decide to add properties to it. I can assign properties to an array using bracket notation like this:

array['name'] = 'keith';

The property 'name' : keith will be added to the list of properties of the array. Also, just like using bracket notation with objects, the expression inside the bracket is first stringified. So if I were to say array[undefined] = '42' (of course, no one would ever do that), undefined is converted to a string and I now have another property 'undefined' : 42. array.length is still 0 since non-integer keys (aka indices) don't count towards the length.

Now, here's where I get confused a bit. On a 'normal' object if I were to do this: myObject[10] = 10 then I would have an object with the property '10' : 10, the property name 10 having been stringified. According to what we just did, then, array['2'] = 'foo'; should add the property '2' : 'foo' to the array and array[3] = 'bar'; should do the same thing: become properties of the array and not count towards the length. But, of course, both of those statements simply assign their values to the respective indices in the array. I'm not complaining, since that behavior is more intuitive, I'm just wondering where my logic leads me astray. I only learned all of this today after reading that array[0] = 'cat'; is effectively evaluated as array[ (0).toString() ] = 'cat';

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From Mozilla Developer resources:

It's possible to quote the JavaScript array indexes as well (e.g., years["2"] instead of years[2]), although it's not necessary. The 2 in years[2] is coerced into a string by the JavaScript engine through an implicit toString conversion. It is for this reason that "2" and "02" would refer to two different slots on the years object and the following example could be true:

console.log(years["2"] != years["02"]);

Basically if what you pass is a string (or int, because it will be converted to string) that could be an integer (Like '0') it will refer to the index of that integer. If not it will add a property to the Array object you are creating, and not count for the length.

Beware that manually increasing the length of the Array will not create new empty elements, although decreasing the length will actually remove the corresponding elements from the end of the Array.

For very specific applications where you might need dense arrays (with fixed lengths) take a look at Typed Arrays.


Check out this example (jsFiddle):

var test = new Array();
test[undefined] = 'undefined';
console.log(test);
console.log(test.length);

// This adds a property to the object 'test'
// Returns:
// [undefined: "undefined"]
// 0 

test['string'] = 'string';
console.log(test);
console.log(test.length);

// This adds another property to the object 'test'
// Returns:
// [undefined: "undefined", string: "string"] 
// 0 

test['00'] = 'zero 00';
console.log(test);
console.log(test.length);

// This adds yet another property to the object 'test',
// since 00 is not explicitly an int.
// Returns:
// [undefined: "undefined", string: "string", 00: "zero 00"] 
// 0

test['0'] = 'zero 0';
console.log(test);
console.log(test.length);

// This adds an element to the array 'test'
// Returns:
// ["zero 0", undefined: "undefined", string: "string", 00: "zero 00"] 
// 1

test[0] = 'zero 0 int';
console.log(test);
console.log(test.length);

// This overrides the element at index 0 in the array 'test'
// Returns:
// ["zero 0 int", undefined: "undefined", string: "string", 00: "zero 00"] 
// 1
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The answer is YES.

Array is object too, and the index of array is also object propery.

From the document:

Property names

Property names must be strings. This means that non-string objects cannot be used as keys in the object. Any non-string object, including a number, is typecasted into a string via the toString method.

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According to the ECMAScript - 15.4, a particular value p is considered to be an array index if and only if:

(p >>> 0 === p) && (p >>> 0 !== Math.pow(2, 32) - 1)

In your case, the two keys you've mentioend are seen as array indices and therefore count towards the length of the array, which is one higher than the highest index.

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