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I'm writing a customer parser to extract key parts of information from application logs to help with debugging issues.

Within the parser code I have lots of examples of the following sort of logic:

    String element = "";
    if( rawLogText.contains("RequestType") ) {
        element = "RequestType";
    }
    else if( rawLogText.contains("ResponseType") ) {
        element = "ResponseType";
    }

    if( element.equals("") ) {
        return;
    }

I feel like there is a cleaner way to do this sort of check-set-return-process logic.

Can anyone come up with a cleaner way to do it?

Here's what I had initially, but the multiple contains checks bugged me.

    String element = "";
    if( rawLogText.contains("RequestType") || rawLogText.contains("ResponseType") ) {
        if( rawLogText.contains("RequestType") ) {
            element = "RequestType";
        }
        else if( rawLogText.contains("ResponseType") ) {
            element = "ResponseType";
        }
    }
    else {
        return;
    }

I'd also like to avoid ternary statements.

share|improve this question
    
which type of bug? – Deepak Tiwari Mar 26 '14 at 9:35
    
No bug as such, hence the code-quality tag. I'm interested to find out if there is indeed a cleaner way to code the logic presented within the question. – Dan Temple Mar 26 '14 at 9:38
    
Can you provide an example of rawLogText? Maybe preprocessing a bit the log line could help to clean the code. – Averroes Mar 26 '14 at 9:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think that @GuillermoMerino's solution is probably the best.

But if you repeated this pattern a lot in your parsing you could abstract it as a helper method; e.g.

public String matchWord(String input, String... words) {
   for (String word: word) do
       if (input.contains(word) ) {
           return word;
       }
   }
   return "";
}

and use it like this:

String element = matchWord(rawLogText, "RequestType", "ResponseType");
if (element.equals("")) {
    return;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yep, looking through it, abstraction is probably for the best. – Dan Temple Mar 26 '14 at 10:33

What about this instead of checking element.equals():

String element = null;
if( rawLogText.contains("RequestType") ) {
    element = "RequestType";
}
else if( rawLogText.contains("ResponseType") ) {
    element = "ResponseType";
} else {
    return;
}
//continue the process
share|improve this answer

Let's say you put all the types in a string array:

 String[] possibleTypes = {"RequestType", "ResponseType"}; // and such

Now you can use a for loop to check and set value

 String element = ""
 for (String type : possibleTypes) {
     if (rawLogText.contains(type)) {
         element = type;
         break;
     }
 }

 if( element.equals("") ) {
    return;
 }     
share|improve this answer

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