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my first post here.

In summary: I have a netstat output, using "netstat -an" command in Windows, and I would like to get the top number of one of the columns.

The output of netstat is something like this:

  TCP    10.45.43.232:50387     10.42.48.61:902        ESTABLISHED
  TCP    10.45.43.232:50559     46.228.47.115:443      CLOSE_WAIT
  TCP    10.45.43.232:52501     10.48.48.128:3389      ESTABLISHED
  TCP    10.45.43.232:58000     10.46.48.243:63713     ESTABLISHED

The result I want is:

58000

That number is the biggest value on the second column, after the ":" character

So, in essence, I want a grep (and/or sed, awk, etc) which can search through a file, only look in the first 25 characters of each line, and get the highest number after a ":" character.

Tell me if you need more information, thanks in advance!

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

This can be an approach:

netstat ... | sort -t':' -nrk2 | awk -F"[ :]" '{print $8; exit}'

By pieces:

Sort it based on : as delimiter and taking second column into account:

$ netstat ... | sort -t':' -nrk2
  TCP    10.45.43.232:58000     10.46.48.243:63713     ESTABLISHED
  TCP    10.45.43.232:52501     10.48.48.128:3389      ESTABLISHED
  TCP    10.45.43.232:50559     46.228.47.115:443      CLOSE_WAIT
  TCP    10.45.43.232:50387     10.42.48.61:902        ESTABLISHED

Print the biggest:

$ netstat ... | sort -t':' -nrk2 | awk -F"[ :]" '{print $8; exit}'
58000

Or better, using Mark Setchell's approach to fetch the last item:

$ netstat ... | sort -t':' -nrk2 | awk '{sub(/.*:/,"",$2); print $2; exit}'
58000
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1  
Thanks for the help!! I marked fedorqui answer as correct, because I can't mark any as useful due to reputation, but the ones that I combined to my solution are fedorqui's and Mark Setchell's. – user3463543 Mar 26 '14 at 11:12

if the output has leading space/tabs:

netstat...|awk -F':|\\s*' '{p=$4>p?$4:p}END{print p}'

if there is no leading spaces:

netstat ..| awk -F':|\\s*' '{p=$3>p?$3:p}END{print p}'
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1  
Do you have a spare shoulder I can borrow to cry? – jaypal singh Mar 26 '14 at 11:19

I would go with this:

netstat -an | awk '{sub(/.*:/,"",$2); if($2>max)max=$2} END{print max}'

The sub() part strips all characters up to and including a colon, off the second field thereby extracting the port. If that is greater than max, max is updated. At the end, max is printed.

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Here is yet another way using GNU awk:

netstat ... | awk '{split($2,tmp,/:/); a[tmp[2]]++}END{n=asorti(a);print a[n]}' 
  • We split the second field of second column (delimited by :) in a tmp array
  • We populate the values as keys in array a.
  • In the END we use GNU awk asorti function which sorts the keys and print the highest.
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You can also do it with coreutils alone:

netstat ... | cut -d: -f2 | cut -d' ' -f1 | sort -nr | head -n1

Output:

58000
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