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I've been enjoying Hibernate's "yes_no" notation for a while now. I use it a lot on active fields like so:

@Column(name = "active")
@Type(type = "true_false")
public boolean getActive() {
    return active;
}

public void setActive(boolean active) {
    this.active = active;
}

Recently I added a new field called processable, to a different object, like so:

@Column(name = "processable")
@Type(type = "true_false")
public void setProcessable(boolean processable) {
    this.processable = processable;
}

public boolean getProcessable() {
    return processable;
}

When I compile and hibernate builds my database in MySQL, active still shows up as a char but processable is an int. Did I miss something? Do I have a limit on how many char booleans I'm allowed?

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Just for the record, when generating getters and setters in Eclipse, the default style is to have the setter first. This is the simple mistake that led me to my error. Mmmm, code generation. –  Stephano Mar 1 '10 at 8:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm pretty sure that the annotation needs to be on the getter or the property itself and not the setter.

@Column(name = "processable")
@Type(type = "true_false")
public boolean getProcessable() {
    return processable;
}
share|improve this answer
    
wow, that was a close one. aaaaalmost answered my own :) . –  Stephano Feb 15 '10 at 17:03
    
i ran a quick search to see if i could find the source for the annotation and shed a bit more light on why that is, i didn't immediately find anything so i moved on. –  zmf Feb 15 '10 at 17:06
    
np. I'm guessing it just assumes it has read access under the annotation. If not, it just sees boolean and makes an int. I guess this makes sense. Oh if only there was a hibernate annotation compiler :) . –  Stephano Feb 15 '10 at 17:13

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