Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What's the best way to initialize an array in Powershell?

For example the code

$array = @()
for($i=0; $i -lt 5;$i++)
{
	$array[$i] = $FALSE
}

generates the error

Array assignment failed because index '0' was out of range.
At H:\Software\PowerShell\TestArray.ps1:4 char:10
+         $array[$ <<<< i] = $FALSE
share|improve this question
    
tell us what you're trying to accomplish and maybe we'll be able to provide you a better "idiomatic PowerShell" answer. I've never needed to new up an array in PowerShell. –  Peter Seale Oct 22 '08 at 17:07

7 Answers 7

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Yet another alternative:

for ($i = 0; $i -lt 5; $i++) 
{ 
  $arr += @($false) 
}

This one works if $arr isn't defined yet.

Some good posts on PowerShell and arrays:

http://www.leedesmond.com/weblog/?p=183
http://get-powershell.com/2008/02/07/powershell-function-new-array/

share|improve this answer

Here's two more ways, both very concise.

$arr1 = @(0) * 20
$arr2 = ,0 * 20
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, I was trying to figure this out this morning and I think you gave the most concise way to initialize an array. –  Chris Sutton Nov 20 '08 at 16:19
    
Thanks. There's more info here on my blog where this topic came up Sept 2007. halr9000.com/article/430 –  halr9000 Nov 21 '08 at 15:12
    
this is rad. A+ –  spoon16 Sep 6 '09 at 18:54
    
I must be thick. Can someone explain what this is doing and what the * 20 is for? 20 doesn't appear in anyone else's answer, or the question. –  Luke Puplett Jul 24 at 13:54

You can also rely on the default value of the constructor if you wish to create a typed array:

> $a = new-object bool[] 5
> $a
False
False
False
False
False

The default value of a bool is apparently false so this works in your case. Likewise if you create a typed int[] array, you'll get the default value of 0.

Another cool way that I use to initialze arrays is with the following shorthand:

> $a = ($false, $false, $false, $false, $false)
> $a
False
False
False
False
False

Or if you can you want to initialize a range, I've sometimes found this useful:

> $a = (1..5)   
> $a
1
2
3
4
5

Hope this was somewhat helpful!

share|improve this answer
$array = 1..5 | foreach { $false }
share|improve this answer
    
I like this, I dropped a % in place of the foreach and it gives it a really tight initialization. –  Chris Sutton Nov 20 '08 at 16:24
$array = @()
for($i=0; $i -lt 5; $i++)
{
    $array += $i
}
share|improve this answer

The solution I found was to use the New-Object cmdlet to initialize an array of the proper size.

$array = new-object object[] 5 
for($i=0; $i -lt $array.Length;$i++)
{
	$array[$i] = $FALSE
}
share|improve this answer
    
mark yourself as the answer por favor –  Peter Seale Oct 22 '08 at 17:06

If I don't know the size up front, I use an arraylist instead of an array.

$al = New-Object System.Collections.ArayList
for($i=0; $i -lt 5; $i++)
{
    $al.Add($i)
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why use this instead of an array and += ? –  Ryan Fisher Dec 1 '11 at 6:41
    
No particular reason. Just habits from more restrictive languages that require pre-dimensioning of array sizes. Plus I like the extra features built into arraylists. –  EBGreen Dec 1 '11 at 16:56
    
Also if you notice, I did also provide an array += answer. This was all done over 3 years ago before the way that SO should work was really defined. Today I would put both methods into one answer. –  EBGreen Dec 1 '11 at 16:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.