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You might already know, that Safari has a nasty autofill bug where it fills email, username and password fields no matter if you set autocomplete="off" or not.

Here's a basic form:

<form action="/" method="post">
    <p>
        <label>E-mail</label>
        <input type="text" name="email" value="" />
    </p>
    <p>
        <label>Password</label>
        <input type="password" name="password" value="" />
    </p>
</form>

...Safari autofills those fields on page load like it should, job well done!

If you put autocomplete="off" to the fields and/or the form element, Safari still autofills those fields:

<form action="/" method="post" autocomplete="off">
    <p>
        <label>E-mail</label>
        <input type="text" name="email" value="" autocomplete="off" />
    </p>
    <p>
        <label>Password</label>
        <input type="password" name="password" value="" autocomplete="off" />
    </p>
</form>

Even this doesn't work:

<form action="/" method="post" autocomplete="off">
    <p>
        <label>E-mail</label>
        <input type="text" name="secretfield1" value="" autocomplete="off"/>
    </p>
    <p>
        <label>Password</label>
        <input type="password" name="secretfield2" value="" autocomplete="off" />
    </p>
</form>

...since Safari looks up those <label> elements if they contain words "E-mail", "Password" etc. and goes ahead with the autofill.

Aaaahhhhha!, I thought, and tried this:

<form action="/" method="post" autocomplete="off">
    <p>
        <label>%REPLACE_EMAIL_TITLE%</label>
        <input type="text" name="%REPLACE_EMAIL_NAME%" value="" autocomplete="off"/>
    </p>
    <p>
        <label>%REPLACE_PASSWORD_TITLE%</label>
        <input type="password" name="%REPLACE_PASSWORD_NAME%" value="" autocomplete="off" />
    </p>
</form>

...and replace %TAGS% with the real names using JavaScript. Safari autofill kicks in. No matter if you set a 10 second timeout on the replacement.

So, is this really the only option?

<form action="/" method="post" autocomplete="off">
    <p>
        <label>That electronic postal address we all use, but can't write the title here because Safari fills this with YOUR information if you have autofill turned on</label>
        <input type="text" name="someelectronicpostaladdress" value="" autocomplete="off"/>
    </p>
    <p>
        <label>A set of characters, letters, numbers and special characters that is so secret that only you or the user you are changing it for knows, but can't write the title here because Safari sucks</label>
        <input type="password" name="setofseeecretcharacters" value="" autocomplete="off" />
    </p>
</form>

I hope not?

UPDATE: @skithund pointed out in Twitter, that Safari is getting a 4.0.3 update, which mentions "Login AutoFill". Does anyone know if that update is going to fix this?

share|improve this question
1  
Safari 4.0.3 update didn't fix this problem. –  Jari Apr 2 '14 at 8:45
1  
This is biting me, too; hope there's a real solution out there. –  Jim Miller Apr 2 '14 at 15:47

5 Answers 5

I had the same problem. And though my solution is not perfect it seems to work. Basically Safari seems to look for an input field with password and username and always tries to fill it. So, my solution was to add a fake username and password field before the current one which safari could fill. I tried using style .. display none but that did not work. So eventually i just used style="position:absolute; top:-50px;" this hid the input field out of sight and seemed to work fine. I did to want to use javascript but i guess you could hide it with javscript.

Now safari never autocompleted my username and password fields.

share|improve this answer
3  
wow, thanks, it works, bless! Safari desktop autofilling form no more. here is the code prepended before the actual input field <input id="fake_user_name" name="fake_user[name]" style="position:absolute; top:-100px;" type="text" value="Safari Autofill Me"> –  kitschmaster May 8 '14 at 9:13
1  
Note that I used <input id="fake_user_name" name="fake_user[name]" style="position:absolute; top:-100px; display:none;" type="text" value="Safari Autofill Me"> and that worked for me. –  usumoio Jul 12 '14 at 3:22
1  
Just saying, why not use only style="display:none" seems cleaner IMO, Its not going to show up miraculously bro lmao. –  CreativityKills Jul 21 '14 at 6:22
2  
At least on Mac Safari ignores input boxes with style="display:none" and chooses another victim for autofill. If only software is so smart when it is really needed... –  Michal Aug 22 '14 at 13:02
    
@Michal You're so right :( –  Dmitry Evseev Feb 23 at 20:35

After scanning through Apple's Safari HTML pages and not finding anything on auto complete, I did some searching and thinking.

After reading a (mildly) related question on Apple discussions, I remembered that the default is to not allow remembered passwords, etc (which can be enabled in iDevice system settings, or at the prompt). Since Apple has moved this feature out of the browser and into their (proprietary, i)OS (screen shots on this article), I believe they are ignoring the HTML form/field property entirely.

Unless they change their mentality as to this feature, as I'm sure this is their expected behavior, on their locked down devices, I would work under the assumption that this isn't going away. This is probably different for native iOS apps. Definitely keep the form autocomplete="off" and hopefully they'll one day get back to the HTML5 standard for the feature.

I know this doesn't include any work around, but I think if you come to terms with it being a non-browser 'feature' on iDevices, it makes sense (in an Apple kind of way).

share|improve this answer
    
This applies to Chrome and Chromium as well. See this bug report. It just seems like you have an Apple axe to grind. –  CadentOrange Aug 13 '14 at 9:51
    
I hadn't run into it in Chrome, but then I suspect they handle it slightly differently too. No axe, I like Apple's products as they usually do what's expected. I'm just leery of any individual vendor applying their own rules to supercede the W3's standards. –  Eric McCormick Aug 13 '14 at 15:47

Fix: browser autofill in by readonly-mode and set writable on focus

 <input type="password" readonly onfocus="this.removeAttribute('readonly');"/>

(focus = at mouse click and tabbing through fields)

Explanation: Browser auto fills credentials to wrong text field?

Ok, you just noticed that:

Safari autofill kicks in. No matter [what the fields are named] @Jari

and there's an assumption that:

Safari seems to look for an input field with password and username and always tries to fill it @user3172174

Sometimes I notice this strange behavior on Chrome and Safari, when there are password fields in the same form. I guess, the browser looks for a password field to insert your saved credentials. Then it autofills username into the nearest textlike-input field , that appears prior the password field in DOM (just guessing due to observation). As the browser is the last instance and you can not control it,

sometimes even autocomplete=off would not prevent to fill in credentials into wrong fields, but not user or nickname field.

This readonly-fix above worked for me.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the only hack that worked for me –  Tim Rodham Apr 24 at 9:27

You can try this variant. It works for me. If you change field value once, Safari will change it again. If user clicked at this field, after this the value wouldn't be changed by Safari automatically.

  $.browser.chrome = /chrome/.test(navigator.userAgent.toLowerCase());
        if($.browser.chrome){
            $.browser.safari = false;
        }

        var isChanged=false;

        $('#Email').change(function () {
            if ($.browser.safari && !isChanged) {
                $('#Email').val('@Model.Email');
            }
        });

        $('#Email').click(function () {
            if ( $.browser.safari && !isChanged) {
                isChanged = true;
            }
        }); var isChangePassword = false;
    $('#OldPassword').change(function () {
        if ($.browser.safari && !isChangePassword) {
            $('#OldPassword').val('');
        }
    });

    $('#OldPassword').click(function () {
        if ($.browser.safari && !isChangePassword) {
            isChangePassword= true;
        }
    });
share|improve this answer

The reason browsers are ignoring autocomplete=off is because there have been some web-sites that tried to disable auto-completing of passwords.

That is wrong; and in July 2014 Firefox was the last major browser to finally implement the change to ignore any web-site that tries to turn off autocompleting of passwords.

Any attempt by any web-site to circumvent the browser's preference is wrong, that is why browsers ignore it. There is no reason known why a web-site should try to disable saving of passwords.

  • Chrome ignores it
  • Safari ignores it
  • IE ignores it
  • Firefox ignores it

What if I'm a special snowflake?

There are people who bring up a good use-case:

I have a shared, public area, kiosk style computer. We don't want someone to (accidentally or intentionally) save their password so they next user could use it.

That does not violate the statement:

Any attempt by any web-site to circumvent the browser's preference is wrong

That is because in the case of a shared kiosk:

  • it is not the web-server that has the oddball policy
  • it is the client user-agent that has the oddball policy

The browser (the shared computer) is the one that has the requirement that it not try to save passwords.

The correct way to prevent the browser from saving passwords
is to configure the browser to not save passwords.

Since you have locked down and control this kiosk computer: you control the settings. That includes the option of saving passwords.

In Chrome and Internet Explorer, you configure those options using Group Policies (e.g. registry keys).

From the Chrome Policy List:

AutoFillEnabled

Enable AutoFill

Data type: Boolean (REG_DWORD)

Windows registry location: Software\Policies\Chromium\AutoFillEnabled

Description: Enables Chromium's AutoFill feature and allows users to auto complete web forms using previously stored information such as address or credit card information. If you disable this setting, AutoFill will be inaccessible to users. If you enable this setting or do not set a value, AutoFill will remain under the control of the user. This will allow them to configure AutoFill profiles and to switch AutoFill on or off at their own discretion.

Please pass the word up to corporate managers that trying to disable autocompleting of password is wrong. It is so wrong that browsers are intentionally ignoring anyone who tries to do it. Those people should stop doing the wrong thing.™

share|improve this answer
    
Passwords, maybe, but why do they so strongly enforce such a lack of regard for standards on username/email fields? It causes real problems for things like editing profiles. –  Tim Rodham Apr 24 at 9:27
    
@TimRodham The reason all browsers starting ignoring autocomplete=off is because some web-sites showed they could not be trusted to use autocomplete=off responsibly. Web-sites tried to disable autocomplete of usernames and passwords, in violation of the user's wishes. Few rotten apples and all that. I suggest if you don't want the browser to auto-complete a username field, you click "no" when it asks you if you want it to remember the contents of the username field. –  Ian Boyd Apr 24 at 21:00

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