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I am trying to set up a class (multivariate distribution function) that stores boost distributions in a std::vector (marginal distribution functions). While this is possible using boost::variant (see my question: Boost: Store Pointers to Distributions in Vector), I also gave boost::any a try. The reason being that with variant I have to hard-code the potential types (marginal distributions) when setting up the variant and I wanted to avoid this.

While the different implemented distribution classes do not share a common parent class, there are functions such as boost::math::cdf or boost::math::pdf that can be applied to all distributions, and that I want to apply iterating over the std::vector.

Working with any I produced the code below (which is running fine), but now I have the problem that the function any_cdf needs to check the types.

While I circumvented hard-coding the types when setting up the vector (as for variant) I now need to hard-code the types in the any_cdf function (while the solution with variants can handle the application of the cdf function via a templated visitor function, and thus without any type specifications) which means lots of code to manage, lots of if statements...

However, the logic does not change at all (I cast the type, then apply the cdf function in all if statements), and I wouldn't really care how the function behaves if something other than a boost distribution gets stored in the list.

So is there any chance to have my cake and eat it, meaning not being forced to hard-code the casting type of the distribution in any_cdf (much like a templated visitor function for variants)?

Thanks so much for your help, H.

P.s. if this is not feasible, would I generally be better of with boost::any or boost::variant in this situation?

#include <boost/math/distributions.hpp>
#include <boost/any.hpp>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <limits>

//template function to apply cdf
template<class T> T any_cdf(boost::any a, T &x){

    //declare return value
    T y;

    //cast any with hardcoded types
    if (a.type() == typeid(boost::math::normal_distribution<T>)){

    y = boost::math::cdf(boost::any_cast< boost::math::normal_distribution<T> >(a),x);

    } else if (a.type() == typeid(boost::math::students_t_distribution<T>)){

    y = boost::math::cdf(boost::any_cast< boost::math::students_t_distribution<T> >(a), x);

    } else {
    //return NaN in case of failure or do something else (throw exception...)
    y =  std::numeric_limits<T>::quiet_NaN();
    }

    return(y);
}



int main (int, char*[])
{
    //get distribution objects
    boost::math::normal_distribution<double> s;
    boost::math::students_t_distribution<double> t(1);

    //use any to put just any kind of objects in one vector 
    std::vector<boost::any> vec_any;
    vec_any.push_back(s);
    vec_any.push_back(t);

    //evaluation point and return value 
    double y;
    double x = 1.96;

    for (std::vector<boost::any>::const_iterator iter = vec_any.begin(); iter != vec_any.end(); ++iter){

        y = any_cdf<double>(*iter,x);
        std::cout << y << std::endl;

    }

    return 0;
}

Edit: Concerning the comments any seems not to be the easiest/best choice for the task at hand. However for completeness reasons a visitor like implementation for boost::any is discussed at: visitor pattern for boost::any

share|improve this question
    
You might find something to help you here –  Matt Phillips Mar 26 at 15:56
    
Do you really need a dynamic vector of distributions? Can you have a static list (e.g. a tuple of them)? This opens up more interesting and efficient possibilities –  sehe Mar 26 at 16:52
    
I went ahead and posted the other answer too... Hope you like it –  sehe Mar 26 at 17:20
    
@sehe wow, thanks. I'll check it out. To the motivation behind all this: The final idea is to create a class that takes univariate distributions and joins them into a multivariate one (e.g. taking the product, what I am actually aiming at is a joint distribution by means of a copula: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copula_%28probability_theory%29). Now the dimension (number of distributions) is theoretically not limited, that's why I go for a dynamic setting. Maybe that's however overkill as the applications would typically be in low (2,3,... < 10) dimensions. –  user3456032 Mar 26 at 17:23
    
@user3456032 I've extended my second answer to cater for this kind of task. Cheers –  sehe Mar 26 at 20:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Update This is the answer assuming a vector and boost::any vs. boost::variant. If you can use a tuple<> see my other answer

You will end up hardcoding the potential types one way or another.

With variant, you can group and hide the complexities by using visitor:

struct invoke_member_foo : boost::static_visitor<double>
{
     template <typename Obj, typename... Args> 
        double operator()(Obj o, Args const&... a) const {
            return o.foo(a...);
     }
};

This can be applied to your variant like

boost::apply_visitor(invoke_member_foo(), my_variant);

With boost any, you'd do the typeswitching the boring and manual way:

if (auto dist1 = boost::any_cast<distribution1_t>(&my_any))
    dist1->foo();
else if (auto dist2 = boost::any_cast<distribution2_t>(&my_any))
    dist2->foo();
else if (auto dist3 = boost::any_cast<distribution3_t>(&my_any))
    dist3->foo();

IMO this is clearly inferior for maintainability e.g.

  • you can't easily extend the type list with an element type that is similar enough to satisfy the same concept and have it support - you'll need to add cases to the type-switch manually (and if you don't - you're out of luck, there is no error and you'll have (silent) bugs. With variant you'll just get a compile error whenever your visitor doesn't handle your type.

  • this work ^ (the type switching) gets duplicated for each operation that you want to implement across the board. Of course, you can implement the type-switch once, and provide the actual implementation as a functor, but at that moment you'll have implemented the exact equivalent of a static_visitor as I showed for the variant, except with far less efficient implementation.

  • boost::any can only contain values that are CopyConstructible. Boost variant can even contain references (e.g. boost::variant<dist1_t&, dist2_t&>) and has (some) move-semantics support

In short, boost::any saves on time thought in advance, but all it does is shift the work to the call-sites.


On a positive note, let me share with you an idiom I like, which makes visitors accessible as ordinary free functions. Let's rewrite your any_cdf function for the variant:

namespace detail
{
    template <typename T> struct var_cdf_visitor : boost::static_visitor<T> {
        template <typename Dist>
            T operator()(Dist& dist, T& x) const { return boost::math::cdf(dist, x); }
    };
}

template<class T> T var_cdf(VarDist<T> a, T &x) 
{
    static detail::var_cdf_visitor<T> vis;
    return boost::apply_visitor(
            boost::bind(vis, ::_1, boost::ref(x)),
            a);
}

A full running program can be found Live On Coliru

Demo Listing

#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/math/distributions.hpp>
#include <boost/variant.hpp>
#include <iostream>
#include <limits>
#include <vector>

namespace detail
{
    template <typename T> struct var_cdf_visitor : boost::static_visitor<T> {
        template <typename Dist>
            T operator()(Dist const& dist, T const& x) const { return boost::math::cdf(dist, x); }
    };
}

template<class T, typename... Dist> T var_cdf(boost::variant<Dist...> const& a, T const& x) {
    return boost::apply_visitor(boost::bind(detail::var_cdf_visitor<T>(), ::_1, x), a);
}

int main()
{
    namespace bm = boost::math;
    typedef std::vector<boost::variant<bm::normal, bm::students_t> > Vec;

    Vec vec { bm::normal(), bm::students_t(1) };

    //evaluation point and return value 
    double x = 1.96;

    for (auto& dist : vec)
        std::cout << var_cdf(dist,x) << std::endl;
}

Actually, though I used a bit of c++11, this could be made even prettier using some c++1y features (if your compiler has them).

And lastly, you can make work for c++03 too; it would just require more time than I currently have to throw at it.

share|improve this answer

Note See my older answer for a discussion of solutions a vector and boost::any vs. boost::variant.

If you don't actually need a dynamic vector of distributions - but just want to apply a statically known list of distributions, you can "get away" with a tuple<> of them.

Now, with a bit (well, a lot) of magic from Phoenix and Fusion, you can "just" adapt the cdf function as a Lazy Actor:

BOOST_PHOENIX_ADAPT_FUNCTION(double, cdf_, boost::math::cdf, 2)

In which case an equivalent extended code sample shrinks to: See it Live On Coliru

int main()
{
    typedef boost::tuple<bm::normal, bm::students_t> Dists;
    Dists dists(bm::normal(), bm::students_t(1));

    double x = 1.96;

    boost::fusion::for_each(dists, std::cout << cdf_(arg1, x) << "\n");

    std::cout << "\nComposite (multiplication):\t" << boost::fusion::accumulate(dists, 1.0, arg1 * cdf_(arg2, x));
    std::cout << "\nComposite (mean):\t\t"         << boost::fusion::accumulate(dists, 0.0, arg1 + cdf_(arg2, x)) / boost::tuples::length<Dists>::value;
}

Whoah. That's... hardly 6 lines of code :) And the best part is it's all c++03 compatible already.

share|improve this answer
    
@user3456032 I've added two lines to show how you could generate composite distributions from N distributions. I randomly chose multiplication and mean for the composition formulae (I have no knowledge about your problem domain). It's probably worth pointing out that the compiler will generate optimal code (as if you handcoded the composition), see complete assembly. –  sehe Mar 26 at 20:28
    
As fixing the exact position for every type seems (at the moment) too restrictive for my application I considered a tuple of variants - which brought me so close to the vector of variants example that I finally settled for that one. Thanks for all the nice examples. –  user3456032 Mar 28 at 9:40
    
@user3456032 I hope I'll not confuse you after you've made up your mind, but here goes: I'd say that using the tuple could be more flexible because you /don't/ have to hardcode the tuple elements. Use some TMP for that. But, depending on your use, the vector could be both more flexible (since, not static) and performant enough. In that case, it will be somewhat easier to maintain if you don't like TMP that much (like me) –  sehe Mar 28 at 9:56

What about:

int main (int, char*[])
{
    boost::math::normal_distribution<double> s;
    boost::math::students_t_distribution<double> t(1);

    typedef std::vector<boost::function<double (double)> > vec_t; 
    vec_t vec_func;
    vec_func.push_back(boost::bind(boost::math::cdf<double>, boost::ref(s), _1));
    vec_func.push_back(boost::bind(boost::math::cdf<double>, boost::ref(t), _1));

    //evaluation point and return value 
    double y;
    double x = 1.96;

    for (vec_t::const_iterator iter = vec_func.begin(); iter != vec_func.end(); ++iter){
        y = (*iter)(x);
        std::cout << y << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

Binding argument to a function template can be tricky though.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 That has merit. Though you should point out that if you are going to compose a distribution from several others, as the OP intends, then e.g. composing 6 distributions will incur the overhead of 6+1 virtual dispatches on each invocation. This is likely not the reason that the OP chose C++. –  sehe Mar 26 at 19:37
    
I agree. Still could be enough –  Alsk Mar 26 at 19:48
    
@Alsk If I see it correctly this literaly stores the cdf function for the respective arguments. I would prefer storing distributions as in the end I want to apply different functions (cdf, pdf, quantile) which would then mean one vector per function? Still boost::function is something that I should look into. –  user3456032 Mar 27 at 15:17
    
@user3456032 You're right, one vector per function. Actually, vec_t here allows to store any function as long as signature is the same, but I suppose you need to distinguish, at the call site, between cdf/pdf anyway. –  Alsk Mar 27 at 19:05

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