Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to call an unmanaged C++ function, that has a structure as an input parameter. The structure is defined in the header file like this:

struct MyStruct
{
int     siOrder;
char     aaszNames[6][25];
int     siId[6];
int     siTones[6];        
};

I tried to declare the managed struct as following:

[StructLayoutAttribute(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet=CharSet.Ansi)]
public struct MyStruct {

public int siOrder;

[MarshalAsAttribute(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst=150)]
public string aaszNames;

[MarshalAsAttribute(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst=6, ArraySubType=UnmanagedType.I4)]
public int[] siId;

[MarshalAsAttribute(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst=6, ArraySubType=UnmanagedType.I4)]
public int[] siTones;
}

But without any success. I am guessing that the marshaling fails, since the aaszNames is actually an array of six 25 long null-terminating strings. I tried declaring aaszNames as

 [MarshalAsAttribute(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst=150)]
 public char[] aaszNames;

filling the array with nulls where necessary. But, again, nothing.

Is there something I am missing? What am I dong wrong? What is the best way to marshal this 2-D char array?

Any hints, please.

share|improve this question
1  
Does not look at all like C++... –  Matthieu M. Feb 15 '10 at 14:43
    
He wants to call a C++ function from C# –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 15 '10 at 14:46
    
I have added a C# tag to hopefully make it clearer as to what is meant. I also thought this was a pure C++ question until I got to the code. –  Yacoby Feb 15 '10 at 14:48
    
I think Matthieu says your unmanaged code is rather C-like and suggests using std::string or something like that in C++? –  Nikola Gedelovski Feb 15 '10 at 15:02
    
yes, i agree it's rather C-like, but this is a third party dll, with a poor documentation referring to it as C++ dll... Cannot really do anything to change this dll. –  TTheot Feb 15 '10 at 15:45

4 Answers 4

Try using multiple C# structs:

[StructLayoutAttribute(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet=CharSet.Ansi)]
public struct MyStruct_Name
{
    [MarshalAsAttribute(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = 25)]
    public string name;
}

[StructLayoutAttribute(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
public struct MyStruct
{
    public int siOrder;

    [MarshalAsAttribute(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 6)]
    public MyStruct_Name aaszNames;

    [MarshalAsAttribute(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 6, ArraySubType = UnmanagedType.I4)]
    public int[] siId;

    [MarshalAsAttribute(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 6, ArraySubType = UnmanagedType.I4)]
    public int[] siTones;
}

This is how I've been passing arrays of C-style strings around.

Don't forget to create the contents of aaszNames! The marshaller hates null references.

MyStruct foo = new MyStruct();
for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++)
{
    foo.aaszNames[i] = new MyStruct_Name();
    foo.aaszNames[i].name = "";
}

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
[MarshalAsAttribute(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst=150)]
 public char[] aaszNames;

That marshalling type looks well. Probably issue in function call, or bad memory allocation/

share|improve this answer
    
The function I am calling, has one more structure as a parameter, with which I have no problem. What exactly do you mean with bad memory allocation? –  TTheot Feb 15 '10 at 15:47
    
1. How you alloc a memory for your struct? 2. Best way for marshal struct as input function parameter is pointer(IntPtr). Typical example: IntPtr strPtr = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(StructType))); Marshal.StructureToPtr(struct,strPtr); Foo(strPtr); Marshal.FreeHGlobal(strPtr); –  necrostaz Feb 15 '10 at 16:26
    
I really do not alloc memory manually. I am aware of that example, but since I manage to successfully pass the other (simpler) struct as input parameter in the same function, and in several others, I thought that leaving this to .NET would also work. –  TTheot Feb 15 '10 at 16:32

I would write a small c-program to check the byte size of the C-structure.
Then I would go with the other suggestion to extract the data field by field.
From a C standpoint the /0 is treated as normal character included in the 6 bytes whereas C# would use a length of 5 and have the /0 hidden.

share|improve this answer
char aaszNames[6][25];

char of C++ Type is 8 bits~

but char of C# Type is Unicode ,(16 bits) !

so char of C++ Type <-> byte of C# type

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.