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I have a list of objects I need to sort on a field, say Score. Without giving much thought I wrote a new class that implements Comparator, that does the task and it works.

Now looking back at this, I am wondering if I should have instead have the my class implement Comparable instead of creating a new class that implements Comparator. The score is the only field that the objects will be ordered on.

  1. What I have done acceptable as a practice?

  2. Is the right approach "First have the class implement Comparable (for the natural ordering) and if an alternative field comparison is required, then create a new class that implements Comparator" ?

  3. If (2) above is true, then does it mean that one should implement Comparator only after they have the class implement Comparable? (Assuming I own the original class).

Thanks!

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14 Answers 14

up vote 37 down vote accepted

I would say that an object should implement Comparable if that is the clear natural way to sort the class, and anyone would need to sort the class would generally want to do it that way.

If, however, the sorting was an unusual use of the class, or the sorting only makes sense for a specific use case, then a Comparator is a better option.

Put another way, given the class name, is it clear how a comparable would sort, or do you have to resort to reading the javadoc? If it is the latter, odds are every future sorting use case would require a comparator, at which point the implementation of comparable may slow down users of the class, not speed them up.

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Can you please give a quick example? –  rgamber Oct 7 '12 at 1:52
    
this might be good example: gist.github.com/yclian/2627608 There is Version class that uses ComparableVersion. Version - provides with factory methods ComparableVersion supposed to be object (with no static methods) - provides an version that is able to be compare with another one. Responsibilities are separated. –  ses May 7 '13 at 17:22

Use Comparable if you want to define a default (natural) ordering behaviour of the object in question, a common practice is to use a technical or natural (database?) identifier of the object for this.

Use Comparator if you want to define an external controllable ordering behaviour, this can override the default ordering behaviour.

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2  
That's a technical explanation, and as correct as they come, but it doesn't really say anything about best practices. –  extraneon Feb 15 '10 at 15:21
23  
it's telling when to use each - if that isn't a best practice, what is it? –  Bozho Feb 15 '10 at 15:22
1  
It may not be the best practice, it is a good practice! –  fastcodejava Sep 15 '10 at 14:12
    
"Does implementing Comparable mean that I'm defining the natural order ?" , this gave me the answer i was looking for. Thanks :) –  Somjit Sep 21 '13 at 2:33

Use Comparable:

  • if the object is in your control
  • if the comparing behaviour if the the main comparing behaviour

Use Comparator :

  • if the object is outside your control and you cannot make them implement Comparable
  • when you want comparing behaviour different from the default (which is specified by Comparable)
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I would say:

  • if the comparison is intuitive, then by all means implement Comparable
  • if it is unclear wether your comparison is intuitive, use a Comparator as it's more explicit and thus more clear for the poor soul who has to maintain the code
  • if there is more than one intuitive comparison possible I'd prefer a Comparator, possibly build by a factory method in the class to be compared.
  • if the comparison is special purpose, use Comparator
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Comparable should be used when you compare instances of same class.

Comparator can be used to compare instances of different classes.

Comparable is implemented by class which need to define a natural ordering for its objects. Like String implements Comparable.

In case one wants a different sorting order then he can implement comparator and define its own way of comparing two instances.

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  • If at the moment of writing the class you have only one use case of sorting use Comparable.
  • Only when you have more than one strategy of sorting implement a Comparator.
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There had been a similar question here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1440134/java-what-is-the-difference-between-implementing-comparable-and-comparator

I would say the following: Implement Comparable for something like a natural ordering, e.g. based on an internal ID

Implement a Comparator if you have a more complex comparing algorithm, e.g. multiple fields and so on.

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1  
Ordering on multiple fields can be as good done with Comparable. –  BalusC Feb 15 '10 at 15:20
    
-1, see BalusC's comment –  Platinum Azure Feb 15 '10 at 15:25

If you need natural order sorting -- User Comparable IF you need Custom Order Sorting - Use Comparator

Example:

Class Employee{
private int id;
private String name;
private String department;
}

Natural order Sorting would be based on id because it would be unique and custom order sortin g would be name and department.

Refrences:
Java: What is the difference between implementing Comparable and Comparator? http://javarevisited.blogspot.com/2011/06/comparator-and-comparable-in-java.html

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Comparable:
Whenever we want to store only homogeneous elements and default natural sorting order required, we can go for class implementing comparable interface.

Comparator:
Whenever we want to store homogeneous and heterogeneous elements and we want to sort in default customized sorting order, we can go for comparator interface.

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Very simple approach is to assume that the entity class in question be represented in database and then in database table would you need index made up of fields of entity class? If answer is yes then implement comparable and use the index field(s) for natural sorting order. In all other cases use comparator.

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My need was sort based on date.

So, I used Comparable and it worked easily for me.

public int compareTo(GoogleCalendarBean o) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    return eventdate.compareTo(o.getEventdate());
}

One restriction with Comparable is that they cannot used for Collections other than List.

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This blog post nicely puts down the differences between the two.

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If you own the class better go with Comparable. Generally Comparator is used if you dont own the class but you have to use it a TreeSet or TreeMap because Comparator can be passed as a parameter in the conctructor of TreeSet or TreeMap. You can see how to use Comparator and Comparable in http://preciselyconcise.com/java/collections/g_comparator.php

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My annotation lib for implementing Comparable and Comparator:

public class Person implements Comparable<Person> {         
    private String firstName;  
    private String lastName;         
    private int age;         
    private char gentle;         

    @Override         
    @CompaProperties({ @CompaProperty(property = "lastName"),              
        @CompaProperty(property = "age",  order = Order.DSC) })           
    public int compareTo(Person person) {                 
        return Compamatic.doComparasion(this, person);         
    }  
}

Click the link to see more examples. http://code.google.com/p/compamatic/wiki/CompamaticByExamples

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