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I'm about to write lines of some simple math and wanted to make sure that there wasn't some simple high level construct in Joda-Time to do this already.

I have an object that represents a day of the week, an hour of the day, and a minute of the hour. For example "Wednesday at 10:14am".

I want to calculate the number of milliseconds until the next occurrence. For example if now is Thursday at 10:14 it would be 6 days worth of milliseconds. This is because Wednesday has already passed so it will take 6 days to get to the next Wednesday. If now is Wednesday at 10:13.0001 it will be 999.

Is there a high level construct in Joda-Time so I can do this in one or two lines of code or do I need to do the math myself (including edge cases to wrap on stuff like DOW < DOW_NOW).

Thanks!

Here's my novice try that does not yet work to give you some reference:

public MutableDateTime getDateTime() {
    MutableDateTime date = MutableDateTime.now();
    date.setDayOfWeek(this.day);
    date.setHourOfDay(this.hour);
    return date;
}

public long getTimeUntilNextFrom( DateTime from ) {
    MutableDateTime to = getDateTime();
    if (to.isBefore( from )) {
        to.setWeekOfWeekyear(from.getWeekOfWeekyear() + 1);
    }

    return new Interval(from, to).toDurationMillis();
}
share|improve this question
    
Your logic escapes me, sorry; can you make the rules more explicit? Between "Wednesday at 10:14am" and "Thursday at 10:14am", as far as I can see, there is only one day's milliseconds worth... –  fge Mar 26 at 17:21
    
I edited to make it more clear. Remember these are days of the week, and weeks recur. So if it is Thursday we don't have a time machine to go back in time to Wednesday, we have to calculate the time until the NEXT Wednesday. –  user1888440 Mar 26 at 17:26
    
OK, so it is in reference to DateTime.now()? What about the timezone? –  fge Mar 26 at 17:27
    
See the example. Timezone won't matter since it is a duration algorithm within a single JVM instance. –  user1888440 Mar 26 at 18:13
    
@user1888440 Timezone will matter if some sysadmin or user changes the machine’s default time zone, or if some other Java code in the same JVM clumsily changes the JVM’s default time zone. A better practice is to always specify your time zone. –  Basil Bourque Mar 26 at 18:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could do something like this:

import org.joda.time.DateTime;
import org.joda.time.DateTimeConstants;
import org.joda.time.Interval;
import org.joda.time.LocalTime;

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Interval interval = betweenNowAndNext(DateTimeConstants.MONDAY, new LocalTime(10, 14));
        System.out.println(interval.toDurationMillis());
    }

    public static Interval betweenNowAndNext(int dayOfWeek, LocalTime time) {
        DateTime now = DateTime.now();
        DateTime closest = time.toDateTime(now).withDayOfWeek(dayOfWeek);
        return new Interval(now, closest.isBefore(now) ? closest.plusWeeks(1) : closest);
    }
}
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I would do it like this:

public class DistanceCalculator {
    public long getMillisecondTillNext(int dayOfWeek, int hourOfDay, int minuteOfHour) {
        DateTime now = DateTime.now();
        DateTime next = DateTime.now().withDayOfWeek(dayOfWeek).withHourOfDay(hourOfDay).withMinuteOfHour(minuteOfHour);
        long distance = next.getMillis() - now.getMillis();
        return distance > 0 ? distance : week() - distance;
    }

    private long week() {
        return new DateTime(0).plusWeeks(1).getMillis();
    }
}

Haven't hear of any readymade method to get this in Joda...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Can you let me know if you think this is better than my attempt to answer my own question? –  user1888440 Mar 26 at 18:36

Here's what I came up with on my own. Still, would be nice to have a solution in fewer lines of code. They DayHour is the class I am working with. It contains a day of the week and the hour of the day.

public class DayHour {
    int day;
    int hour;

    public DayHour(int day, int hour) {
        this.day = day;
        this.hour = hour;
    }

    public MutableDateTime getDateTime(DateTime base) {
        MutableDateTime date = base.toMutableDateTime();
        date.setDayOfWeek(this.day);
        date.setHourOfDay(this.hour);
        return date;
    }

    public long getTimeUntilNextFrom(DateTime from) {
        MutableDateTime to = getDateTime(from);
        if (to.isBefore(from)) {
            to.setWeekOfWeekyear(from.getWeekOfWeekyear() + 1);
        }

        return new Interval(from, to).toDurationMillis();
    }
}

@Test
public void testDayHour() {
    DateTime now = DateTime.now();
    DayHour date = new DayHour(now.getDayOfWeek(), now.getHourOfDay());

    MutableDateTime yesterday = now.toMutableDateTime();
    yesterday.addDays(-1);
    assertEquals(TimeUnit.DAYS.toMillis(1), date.getTimeUntilNextFrom(yesterday.toDateTime()));

    MutableDateTime tomorrow = now.toMutableDateTime();
    tomorrow.addDays(1);
    assertEquals(TimeUnit.DAYS.toMillis(6), date.getTimeUntilNextFrom(tomorrow.toDateTime()));
}
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Not quite sure what you are doing. But if what you want is a countdown in milliseconds, I would use the Joda-Time Seconds class with its secondsBetween method. Multiply by 1,000 to report approximate milliseconds. On the last second, switch gears to use the .getMillis method if you truly need that.

share|improve this answer
    
Why did you add an answer if you didn't understand the question? –  user1888440 Mar 26 at 18:59
    
@user1888440 (a) To show that Joda-Time does indeed have some classes for calculating a delta between date-time in certain units such as Seconds. That seems to be what both the question and other answers are going for. (b) To point out, as did others, that your question is poorly written, while pointing to a possibly better way to phrase it. –  Basil Bourque Mar 26 at 19:03
    
The two answers posted seemed to perfectly understand the question (and both were correct) but thank you for your input. In the future I think you'll get better results asking for clarification in comments rather than answers. That gives the poster the opportunity to more precisely phrase the question. –  user1888440 Mar 26 at 19:07

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