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I have this code

var myObjects = {}; //global variable

//Later on in the code:
for (i in myObjects)
{
    var obj = myObjects[i];
    process(obj);
}

function process(obj)
{
    $.getJSON("example.com/process/", {id: obj.id}, function(result)
      {
          //Will the following change the permanent/global copy e.g 
          // myObjects[44] ?
          obj.addItem(result.id, result.name, result.number);
      }
    );
}

Will the following line:

     obj.addItem(result.id, result.name, result.number);

modify the object by value or by reference, i.e will it modify the local copy of obj or e.g myObjects[44]?

If it affects only the local copy, how can I have it change the global copy of the object?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Primitive variables are passed by value in JavaScript, but objects are passed by reference.

Source and further reading:

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2  
Note that it's a little weirder than that: if you create a string by calling "new String('hi mom')" then it works kind-of like a string sometimes, but it'll act like an Object for parameter passing. That is, it's passed by reference. –  Pointy Feb 15 '10 at 16:36
1  
Actually, strings are immutable in js. Therefore, you are always passing them by reference. All operations on strings return a new string. –  Juan Mendes Feb 15 '10 at 19:39
1  
In JavaScript, when you pass an object, you are really passing an object reference by value. See this earlier question. –  Andrew Dec 10 '12 at 23:36

JavaScript is pass by value, as has been clarified in an earlier question. (Someone with more powers should mark this as duplicate--the answers here are incorrect.)

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all non-object variables are pass-by-value afaik..

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