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I wanted to know why the solution I have written doesn't work:

def transpose(sudoku):
    n = len(sudoku)
    l_tr = [0]*n
    k = 0
    tr_sudoku = [0]*n
    while k < n:
        tr_sudoku[k] = l_tr
        k = k+1  
    i = 0
    for i in range(len(sudoku)):
        j = 0
        for j in range(len(sudoku)):
            tr_sudoku[i][j] = sudoku[j][i]
            print j, i, tr_sudoku, sudoku[i][j]
        print tr_sudoku
return tr_sudoku

correct = [[1,2,3],[2,3,1],[3,1,2]]

print transpose(correct)

It outputs the following incorrect solution:

0 0 [[1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0]] 1
1 0 [[1, 2, 0], [1, 2, 0], [1, 2, 0]] 2
2 0 [[1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3]] 3
[[1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3]]
0 1 [[2, 2, 3], [2, 2, 3], [2, 2, 3]] 2
1 1 [[2, 3, 3], [2, 3, 3], [2, 3, 3]] 3
2 1 [[2, 3, 1], [2, 3, 1], [2, 3, 1]] 1
[[2, 3, 1], [2, 3, 1], [2, 3, 1]]
0 2 [[3, 3, 1], [3, 3, 1], [3, 3, 1]] 3
1 2 [[3, 1, 1], [3, 1, 1], [3, 1, 1]] 1
2 2 [[3, 1, 2], [3, 1, 2], [3, 1, 2]] 2
[[3, 1, 2], [3, 1, 2], [3, 1, 2]]
[[3, 1, 2], [3, 1, 2], [3, 1, 2]]

Help would be appreciated! Thanks.

The ideal correct solution to:

correct = [[1,2,4],[2,3,4],[3,4,2]]

would be:

tr_correct = [[1,2,3],[2,3,4],[4,4,2]]
share|improve this question
    
what (do you think) is a correct solution? – thebjorn Mar 26 '14 at 21:47
    
There's a whole big library for this kind of thing unless you just really get a kick out of doing it yourself. – Two-Bit Alchemist Mar 26 '14 at 21:48
    
The core porblem is that you create the new array tr_sudoku that contains the SAME row l_tr n times. – ExP Mar 26 '14 at 21:50
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can easily transpose with zip:

def transpose(sudoku):
    return list(map(list, zip(*sudoku)))

Example output:

>>> correct = [[1,2,3],[2,3,1],[3,1,2]]
>>> transpose(correct)
[[1, 2, 3], [2, 3, 1], [3, 1, 2]]

The easiest "manual" way is to switch rows and columns:

def transpose_manually(sudoku):
    output = sudoku[:] # new grid the same size
    for r in range(len(sudoku)): # each row
        for c in range(len(sudoku[0])): # each column
            output[c][r] = sudoku[r][c] # switch
    return output
share|improve this answer
    
bah I almost wrote this ... but the using only for/while loops convinced me not to (+1 anyway because this is the right way to do it imho) – Joran Beasley Mar 26 '14 at 21:50
    
It is not the transpose. – user3286261 Mar 26 '14 at 21:57
    
@user3286261 then I suggest you edit your question to provide the output you are expecting, as thebjorn suggested – jonrsharpe Mar 26 '14 at 22:00
    
This gives the correct solution. Thanks! Jon, I do want to know what exactly was wrong with my solution, since it does the same thing as your transpose_manually does. – Pranav Pandit Mar 26 '14 at 22:05
    
@user3466256 oh, sorry, got confused between the various user3xxxxxx! Yours doesn't work because tr_sudoku[k] = l_tr means all rows reference the same list. tr_sudoku[k] = l_tr[:] would have worked, as this creates a shallow copy of the list each time. – jonrsharpe Mar 26 '14 at 22:09

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