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Would python count all items for length or just understand and stop if 2nd item is found?

if len(obj) == 1: ...
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Based on this resource https://wiki.python.org/moin/TimeComplexity the time complexity for len function is O(1), meaning that python already knows how many elements a common "array" data type has.

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5  
It depends on what obj is. Lists, tuples, sets and all basic data type you find in python will store the length inside the object, so it will just compare this value with 1. On custom objects, you cannot be sure. –  JBernardo Mar 26 at 23:05
    
@JBernardo that's true, I edited my response –  Dan Dinu Mar 26 at 23:07

I assume you are thinking of obj as a list of items, in other case I didn't quite get your question so ignore my answer.

Python stores the lenght of a list in its internal data structure, so it does not need to go through it every time you call len, it can just read the value stored.

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yes I meant any iterable –  Zigulik Mar 26 at 23:09
    
@user3379328 So as others pointed out, it is true for lists, dictionaries and tuples. However for other iterables, for example custom ones, it depends on the implementation of __len__ provided. –  teh internets is made of catz Mar 26 at 23:10

None of the Python builtin objects iterate to find len. They all keep track when you add/remove items, so it's O(1)

If you define a __len__ method on your own class that doesn't keep track of it's length, you might do this

def __len__(self):
    return sum(1 for i in self)

Which can't shortcircuit - it has to iterate right to the end.

It's a bunch more complicated to make a short circuiting version, but it can be done.

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