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For given transformation calculation,

CGAffineTransform preferredTransform = CGAffineTransformMake(-1, 0, 0, -1, 1920, 1080);
CGAffineTransform transform1 = CGAffineTransformConcat(CGAffineTransformMakeTranslation(-preferredTransform.tx, -preferredTransform.ty), CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(M_PI));
NSLog(@"%@", NSStringFromCGAffineTransform(transform1));

The output would be [-1, 1.2246467991473532e-16, -1.2246467991473532e-16, -1, 1920.0000000000002, 1079.9999999999998] yet I would expect it to be [-1, 0, 0, -1, 1920, 1080]

Why the rounding errors? Should I apply the transformations differently to produce rounded results?

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

On a 32-bit iPad rounding is correct, However, on a 64-bit iPad the rounding errors occurs. Since rotation by M_PI is the same as scaling by -1, this can be easily fixed by changing it to:

CGAffineTransform preferredTransform = CGAffineTransformMake(-1, 0, 0, -1, 1920, 1080);
CGAffineTransform transform1 = CGAffineTransformConcat(CGAffineTransformMakeTranslation(-preferredTransform.tx, -preferredTransform.ty), **CGAffineTransformMakeScale(-1, -1)**);

NSLog(@"%@", NSStringFromCGAffineTransform(transform1));
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The specified rounding errors are due to 64-bit architecture. If you launch on 32-bit simulator, you shouldn't see those rounding errors.

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So, should I be taking care not to use that M_PI code ? – Maxim Veksler May 2 '14 at 17:17
    
I'm afraid, the problem is not in M_PI. You can cast M_PI to float and see, that transform remains with rounding errors. Solution I came up with is using roundf() function. It fits here because values of transform matrix are in fact integers. I'm not sure how we can fix it for other more complicated transforms. – Alexander Kostiev May 2 '14 at 20:37

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