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I have a small utility that I use to download an MP3 from a website on a schedule and then builds/updates a podcast XML file which I've obviously added to iTunes.

The text processing that creates/updates the XML file is written in Python. I use wget inside a Windows .bat file to download the actual MP3 however. I would prefer to have the entire utility written in Python though. (It was the project I used to begin learning Python.)

I struggled though to find a way to actually down load the file in Python, thus why I resorted to wget.

So, how do I download the file using Python?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 162 down vote accepted

In Python 2, use urllib2 which comes with the standard library.

import urllib2
response = urllib2.urlopen('http://www.example.com/')
html = response.read()

This is the most basic way to use the library, minus any error handling. You can also do more complex stuff such as changing headers. The documentation can be found here.

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9  
This won't work if there are spaces in the url you provide. In that case, you'll need to parse the url and urlencode the path. –  Jason Sundram Apr 14 '10 at 21:17
28  
This has changed in python 3. It should be noted that this solution is for 2.* version of Python. –  Jono Nov 15 '10 at 3:38
8  
Here is the Python 3 solution: stackoverflow.com/questions/7243750/… –  tommy.carstensen Feb 25 at 12:09
2  
Just for reference. The way to urlencode the path is urllib2.quote –  André Puel Aug 2 at 2:09
    
Python programmers might be the laziest ever. Isn't there a standard library way of doing this? –  annoying_squid Sep 29 at 20:25

One more, using urlretrieve:

import urllib
urllib.urlretrieve ("http://www.example.com/songs/mp3.mp3", "mp3.mp3")

Yet another one, with a "progressbar"

import urllib2

url = "http://download.thinkbroadband.com/10MB.zip"

file_name = url.split('/')[-1]
u = urllib2.urlopen(url)
f = open(file_name, 'wb')
meta = u.info()
file_size = int(meta.getheaders("Content-Length")[0])
print "Downloading: %s Bytes: %s" % (file_name, file_size)

file_size_dl = 0
block_sz = 8192
while True:
    buffer = u.read(block_sz)
    if not buffer:
        break

    file_size_dl += len(buffer)
    f.write(buffer)
    status = r"%10d  [%3.2f%%]" % (file_size_dl, file_size_dl * 100. / file_size)
    status = status + chr(8)*(len(status)+1)
    print status,

f.close()
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42  
+1 The status bar was overkill, but fun for sure. –  Mike M. Lin Mar 8 '11 at 1:04
3  
Bug: file_size_dl += block_sz should be += len(buffer) since the last read is often not a full block_sz. Also on windows you need to open the output file as "wb" if it isn't a text file. –  Eggplant Jeff May 25 '11 at 17:53
1  
Me too urllib and urllib2 didn't work but urlretrieve worked well, was getting frustrated - thanks :) –  funk-shun Jul 12 '11 at 6:08
2  
Wrap the whole thing (except the definition of file_name) with if not os.path.isfile(file_name): to avoid overwriting podcasts! useful when running it as a cronjob with the urls found in a .html file –  Sriram Murali May 1 '12 at 20:15
2  
@PabloG it's a tiny bit more than 31 votes now ;) Anyway, status bar was fun so i'll +1 –  AnojiRox Mar 28 '13 at 17:35

In 2012, use the python requests library

>>> import requests
>>> 
>>> url = "http://download.thinkbroadband.com/10MB.zip"
>>> r = requests.get(url)
>>> print len(r.content)
10485760

You can run pip install requests to get it.

Requests has many advantages over the alternatives because the API is much simpler. This is especially true if you have to do authentication. urllib and urllib2 are pretty unintuitive and painful in this case.

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10  
Regrettably, requests has no API for unzipping files. –  hughdbrown Jul 13 '12 at 15:46
1  
@Amigable: I can't honestly say. I don't use Jython. If it's important to you, maybe you could try it out and post a comment on your findings? –  hughdbrown Aug 30 '12 at 21:43
3  
support for zip files/jython/large files: (1) read the source or (2) try it out. This is a stackoverflow answer, not the library documentation. I recommend that developers live by "Suck it and see." idioms.thefreedictionary.com/suck+it+and+see –  hughdbrown Dec 17 '12 at 16:51
3  
It is possible to stream large files by setting stream=True in the request. You can then call iter_content() on the response to read a chunk at a time. –  kvance Jul 28 '13 at 17:14
4  
Why would a url library need to have a file unzip facility? Read the file from the url, save it and then unzip it in whatever way floats your boat. Also a zip file is not a 'folder' like it shows in windows, Its a file. –  Harel Nov 15 '13 at 16:36
import urllib2
mp3file = urllib2.urlopen("http://www.example.com/songs/mp3.mp3")
output = open('test.mp3','wb')
output.write(mp3file.read())
output.close()

the 'wb' in open('test.mp3','wb') opens a (and erases any existing) file, binaraly, so you can save data with it, instead of just text.

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7  
The disadvantage of this solution is, that the entire file is loaded into ram before saved to disk, just something to keep in mind if using this for large files on a small system like a router with limited ram. –  tripplet Nov 18 '12 at 13:33

I agree with Corey, urllib2 is more complete than urllib and should likely be the module used if you want to do more complex things, but to make the answers more complete, urllib is a simpler module if you want just the basics:

import urllib
response = urllib.urlopen('http://www.example.com/sound.mp3')
mp3 = response.read()

Will work fine. Or, if you don't want to deal with the "response" object you can call read() directly:

import urllib
mp3 = urllib.urlopen('http://www.example.com/sound.mp3').read()
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An improved version of the PabloG code for Python 2/3:

from __future__ import ( division, absolute_import, print_function, unicode_literals )

import sys, os, tempfile, logging

if sys.version_info >= (3,):
    import urllib.request as urllib2
    import urllib.parse as urlparse
else:
    import urllib2
    import urlparse

def download_file(url, desc=None):
    u = urllib2.urlopen(url)

    scheme, netloc, path, query, fragment = urlparse.urlsplit(url)
    filename = os.path.basename(path)
    if not filename:
        filename = 'downloaded.file'
    if desc:
        filename = os.path.join(desc, filename)

    with open(filename, 'wb') as f:
        meta = u.info()
        meta_func = meta.getheaders if hasattr(meta, 'getheaders') else meta.get_all
        meta_length = meta_func("Content-Length")
        file_size = None
        if meta_length:
            file_size = int(meta_length[0])
        print("Downloading: {0} Bytes: {1}".format(url, file_size))

        file_size_dl = 0
        block_sz = 8192
        while True:
            buffer = u.read(block_sz)
            if not buffer:
                break

            file_size_dl += len(buffer)
            f.write(buffer)

            status = "{0:16}".format(file_size_dl)
            if file_size:
                status += "   [{0:6.2f}%]".format(file_size_dl * 100 / file_size)
            status += chr(13)
            print(status, end="")
        print()

    return filename

url = "http://download.thinkbroadband.com/10MB.zip"
filename = download_file(url)
print(filename)
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I would remove the parentheses from the first line, because it is not too old feature. –  Arpad Horvath May 30 '13 at 19:37

Wrote wget library in pure Python just for this purpose. It is pumped up urlretrieve with these features as of version 2.0.

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No option to save with custom filename ? –  Alex May 21 at 15:29
    
@Alex added -o FILENAME option to version 2.1 –  techtonik Jul 10 at 11:04

This may be a little late, But I saw pabloG's code and couldn't help adding a os.system('cls') to make it look AWESOME! Check it out :

    import urllib2,os

    url = "http://download.thinkbroadband.com/10MB.zip"

    file_name = url.split('/')[-1]
    u = urllib2.urlopen(url)
    f = open(file_name, 'wb')
    meta = u.info()
    file_size = int(meta.getheaders("Content-Length")[0])
    print "Downloading: %s Bytes: %s" % (file_name, file_size)
    os.system('cls')
    file_size_dl = 0
    block_sz = 8192
    while True:
        buffer = u.read(block_sz)
        if not buffer:
            break

        file_size_dl += len(buffer)
        f.write(buffer)
        status = r"%10d  [%3.2f%%]" % (file_size_dl, file_size_dl * 100. / file_size)
        status = status + chr(8)*(len(status)+1)
        print status,

    f.close()
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cls doesn't do anything on my OS X or nor on an Ubuntu server of mine. Some clarification could be good. –  Kasper Souren Sep 24 at 21:57

Source code can be:

import urllib
sock = urllib.urlopen("http://diveintopython.org/")
htmlSource = sock.read()                            
sock.close()                                        
print htmlSource  
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You can get the progress feedback with urlretrieve as well:

def report(blocknr, blocksize, size):
    current = blocknr*blocksize
    sys.stdout.write("\r{0:.2f}%".format(100.0*current/size))

def downloadFile(url):
    print "\n",url
    fname = url.split('/')[-1]
    print fname
    urllib.urlretrieve(url, fname, report)
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