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I am trying to get more information on what chef resource cloning exactly is. I see them during my chef-client run but don’t know what they mean.

I’ve seen this blog below on resource cloning but I still can’t make sense of what it does. Does anyone have further information on this topic? Can’t find much else using google.

http://scottwb.com/blog/2014/01/24/defeating-the-infamous-chef-3694-warning/

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I'm pretty sure that article does a great job of explaining it... What are you confused on? –  sethvargo Mar 27 at 15:45
    
say for example i have the following 2 resources """service "apache2" do action :enable end """ and """service "apache2" do action :start end""" and they are in diff cookbooks. when its cloned does that mean the service that starts apache is lost? or does it merge them? –  user3440013 Mar 27 at 20:03

1 Answer 1

chef-client will merge resource definitions by their type and name (service[apache2] in your example). If you're working on wrapper cookbook check this great article: http://www.getchef.com/blog/2013/12/03/doing-wrapper-cookbooks-right from Julian Dunn.

Anyway, you can modify previously defined resources. In your case:

resources('service[apache2]').action [:enable, :start]

This will modify already defined resource service[apache2] and hide resource cloning warnings.

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i see. so what happens if for example. i have a role and it does the following. recipe1-install-apache -> recipe-2-somechanges_that_also_edit_apache.conf -> recipe3-start apache. in this case if im merging, i lose the sequence i wanted this to run in. I know the request doesnt make any sense but it's really just to understand the theory behind cloning. thanks for your help! –  user3440013 Mar 28 at 19:29

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