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I am using this code using isset to check if empty:

    if(!isset($this->objCodes[0]->SignupCode))$this->objCodes[0]->"NULL";

But it doesn't work. Help?

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What error message do you get? –  Gumbo Feb 15 '10 at 17:51
    
don't quote NULL unless you want it to be a string instead of a null value –  dnagirl Feb 15 '10 at 17:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You might want to use empty to check if the value has a value that might be useless. If your SignupCode will never be an empty string (""), 0, or another empty value, try this:

if(empty($this->objCodes[0]->SignupCode))
{
    $this->objCodex[0] = null;
}

The reason I normally use empty() is because if I am importing from a database, the data I am looking for will always return true to isset() because it was set by the database. I'm more interested if it is null or an empty string, as that means there really isn't anything of value in the variable.

If you are loading values into your object like this:

$result = mysql_query("Some Query");
while($temp = mysql_fetch_assoc($result)
{
    $myObj = new stdClass;
    $myObj->SignupCode = $temp['SignupCode'];
    $myObjs[] = $myObj;
}

You will always recieve a true to the isset() function when testing like this:

if(isset($myObjs[0]->SignupCode))

Because the value is technically always going to be 'set'

If you are actually trying to see if it isn't set at all, try this:

if(!isset($this->objCodes[0]->SignupCode))
{
    $this->objCodex[0] = null;
}
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1  
Using empty() would prevent values 0 or "0" from being correct. –  aefxx Feb 15 '10 at 17:59
    
Re-read my answer please... –  Tyler Carter Feb 15 '10 at 17:59
1  
I did and the way I interpret the OP's question, he/she wants to test with isset as it either is an object that has a set member named SignupCode or not. –  aefxx Feb 15 '10 at 18:26
    
cool, this is useful, currently the DB defaults to "null" which is what is causing the fail. Let me try again....thank you. –  Angela Feb 17 '10 at 1:20
    
actually, how would I create a "default" value and assign it to the $this->objCodex[0] = $string? –  Angela Feb 20 '10 at 23:03

I believe the error you're receiving is from the invalid property accessor ->"NULL".

The isset function should be used to check if an array index exists, such as the [0] index you check on objCodes:

if(isset($this->objCodes[0])) {

Without knowing the type of object you currently have in the objCodes array that has the property of SignupCode I can't be specific in an answer for setting a default but if I use the class ObjectCode as an example you could set a default value on your array element like this:

if(!isset($this->objCodes[0])) {
  $this->objCodes[0] = new ObjectCode();
}

If I knew more about what you're trying to achieve with that code block I could be more descriptive.

UPDATE: If you really wanted to ensure that your collection always gave back a value you could create a container that implemented the ArrayAccess interface and then implement the offsetGet method to return a default when the requested index is not found:

public class ObjectCodeContainer implements ArrayAccess {
  private $collection;

  public function __construct() {
    $this->collection = array();
  }

  public function offsetGet($offset) {
    if(!isset($this->collection[$offset])) {
      $this->collection[$offset] = new ObjectCode();
    }

    return $this->collection[$offset];
  }

  // implement the other abstract methods
}
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Well is $this->objCodes defined? If so is it an array? It would also work as a string since you can treat a sring ans an array of single chars. Also with your statement youre actually checking if SignupCode isset on an object... not if $this->objCodes[0] is set.

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$default = array('color' => 'blue', 'model' => 'Verizon', 'sex' => 'Female');

$new = array('color' => 'red', 'sex' => 'Male');

$array = array_merge($default, $new);

var_dump($array);
// array('color' => 'red', 'model' => 'Verizon', 'sex' => 'Male')
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1  
WTF?.................. –  Tyler Carter Feb 15 '10 at 18:12
    
@Chacha102 - How do I define a default value for an array in php to avoid undefined offset? –  TiuTalk Feb 15 '10 at 18:42
    
Right, but that only works if you are wanting default values for specific known keys. –  Xiong Chiamiov Mar 9 '11 at 18:45

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