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I have to create a procedure where it's possible to do two inserts into two tables - dynamically.

Both tables depend on each other.

My idea wos something like this:

create or replace PROCEDURE INSERT_DYN( 
  par_table_name_a IN STRING, 
  par_keys_a IN ARRAY, 
  par_values_a IN ARRAY,

  par_table_name_b IN STRING, 
  par_keys_b IN ARRAY, 
  par_values_b IN ARRAY)
AS
BEGIN
  INSERT INTO par_table_name_a(par_keys_a) VALUES(par_values_a);
  INSERT INTO par_table_name_b(par_keys_b) VALUES(par_values_b);

 commit;
END INSERT_DYN;

But there is no simple type like "Array" where i can put numbers, dates, strings or keys.

How can i solve this problem?

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1  
You could pass everything as strings, and you could look at the. ANYDATA type, but why would yo want to do this, and lose any schema and type checking you could have from the code compilation? How many pairs of dependent tables do you have to make this worthwhile (and how are they dependent; one has an FK to the other)? –  Alex Poole Mar 27 at 8:36

1 Answer 1

Check Package DBMS_SQL, there you find all procedures. An untested example is this one:

CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE VARCHAR_TABLE_TYPE AS TABLE OF VARCHAR2(1000);

create or replace PROCEDURE INSERT_DYN( 
  par_table_name_a IN VARCHAR2, 
  par_keys_a IN VARCHAR_TABLE_TYPE, 
  par_values_a IN VARCHAR_TABLE_TYPE) as

cur INTEGER;
res INTEGER;
sqlcmd VARCHAR2(10000);

begin

sqlcmd := 'INSERT INTO '||par_table_name_a||' (';
FOR i in par_keys_a.first..par_keys_a.last loop
   sqlcmd := sqlcmd ||par_keys_a(i)||',';
end loop;
sqlcmd := REGEXP_REPLACE(sqlcmd, ',$', ')');

sqlcmd := sqlcmd||' values ('
FOR i in par_keys_a.first..par_keys_a.last loop
   sqlcmd := sqlcmd ||':b'||i||',';
end loop;
sqlcmd := REGEXP_REPLACE(sqlcmd, ',$', ')');

-- Check if command is properly composed:
DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(sqlcmd);

cur := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
DBMS_SQL.PARSE(cur, sqlcmd, DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
FOR i in par_keys_a.first..par_keys_a.last loop
    DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(cur, ':b'||i, par_values_a(i));
END LOOP;
res := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(cur);
DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(cur);

end;

An array (in Oracle it is called "Nested Table") contains only elements of the same datatype, here I took VARCHAR2. For NUMBER type values it's no problem to use the same Nested Table. For DATE or similar values you have to do some tricks, e.g. work with some pattern und Regular Expression or provide another Nested table holding the Datatype of each field.

Another solution is to skip the bind variables and make a hard parse, i.e. replace this

sqlcmd := sqlcmd||' values ('
FOR i in par_keys_a.first..par_keys_a.last loop
   sqlcmd := sqlcmd ||':b'||i||',';
end loop;
sqlcmd := REGEXP_REPLACE(sqlcmd, ',$', ')');
...
END;

by this one

sqlcmd := sqlcmd||' values ('
FOR i in par_keys_a.first..par_keys_a.last loop
   sqlcmd := sqlcmd ||''''||par_values_a(i)||''',';
end loop;
sqlcmd := REGEXP_REPLACE(sqlcmd, ',$', ')');
EXECUTE IMMEDIATE sqlcmd;
END;

However, this opens the door for SQL-Injections and you still get problems with other datatypes than VARCHAR or NUMBER

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