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I want to create a user that will have only read permissions That it will be able to run SELECT queries but will not be able to run UPDATE,INSERT... or modify the DB. I read that USAGE means - no permissions, what can it do? Will a user with USAGE permissions be able to modify the DB?

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3 Answers 3

In phpMyadmin you set priviliges according to your wishes. This meaning: If you only wan't the user to be able to run SELECT queries, Thats what you select. The user will then not beable to edit your data in any way.

Hope this helps.

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tnx but I already have a user with only USAGE permission, what can he do? –  Asaf Maoz Mar 27 '14 at 8:52
    
USAGE on its own doen't grant any privilliges as far as I know. –  Philip G Mar 27 '14 at 11:09

The best way to learn the capabilities of an account is to test it, try to create a test table and log in with that user, try also to execute the writing commands on it and you'll see by yourself if he can write or not.

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https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/privileges-provided.html#priv_usage

The USAGE privilege specifier stands for “no privileges.” It is used at the global level with GRANT to modify account attributes such as resource limits or SSL characteristics without affecting existing account privileges.

So no, a user with only USAGE will not be able to see or create other databases. They can connect, see information_schema, get STATUS, and very little else.

Anyway, you've mentioned phpMyAdmin which doesn't provide USAGE as a checkbox in the permissions area; creating a user with no other options selected gives USAGE privileges here. Select anything further you wish to allow from the checkboxes provided.

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