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So, the @cache_page decorator is awesome. But for my blog I would like to keep a page in cache until someone comments on a post. This sounds like a great idea as people rarely comment so keeping the pages in memcached while nobody comments would be great. I'm thinking that someone must have had this problem before? And this is different than caching per url.

So a solution I'm thinking of is:

@cache_page( 60 * 15, "blog" );
def blog( request ) ...

And then I'd keep a list of all cache keys used for the blog view and then have way of expire the "blog" cache space. But I'm not super experienced with Django so I'm wondering if someone knows a better way of doing this? Thanks.

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up vote 32 down vote accepted

Here's a solution I wrote to do just what you're talking about on some of my own projects:

def expire_view_cache(view_name, args=[], namespace=None, key_prefix=None):
    """
    This function allows you to invalidate any view-level cache. 
        view_name: view function you wish to invalidate or it's named url pattern
        args: any arguments passed to the view function
        namepace: optioal, if an application namespace is needed
        key prefix: for the @cache_page decorator for the function (if any)
    """
    from django.core.urlresolvers import reverse
    from django.http import HttpRequest
    from django.utils.cache import get_cache_key
    from django.core.cache import cache
    # create a fake request object
    request = HttpRequest()
    # Loookup the request path:
    if namespace:
        view_name = namespace + ":" + view_name
    request.path = reverse(view_name, args=args)
    # get cache key, expire if the cached item exists:
    key = get_cache_key(request, key_prefix=key_prefix)
    if key:
        if cache.get(key):
            # Delete the cache entry.  
            #
            # Note that there is a possible race condition here, as another 
            # process / thread may have refreshed the cache between
            # the call to cache.get() above, and the cache.set(key, None) 
            # below.  This may lead to unexpected performance problems under 
            # severe load.
            cache.set(key, None, 0)
        return True
    return False

Django keys these caches of the view request, so what this does is creates a fake request object for the cached view, uses that to fetch the cache key, then expires it.

To use it in the way you're talking about, try something like:

from django.db.models.signals import post_save
from blog.models import Entry

def invalidate_blog_index(sender, **kwargs):
    expire_view_cache("blog")

post_save.connect(invalidate_portfolio_index, sender=Entry)

So basically, when ever a blog Entry object is saved, invalidate_blog_index is called and the cached view is expired. NB: haven't tested this extensively, but it's worked fine for me so far.

share|improve this answer
    
It does the trick really well with database cache, but doesn't work for me with filesystem cache: key = get_cache_key(request) returns None with filesystem cache, but returns the correct key with database cache. Have you got an idea on how to make it run with filesystem cache backend? – user650108 Oct 10 '13 at 11:11
    
get_cache_key returns nothing. – avances123 Mar 17 '14 at 10:06
    
after you unset the cache, would django automatically cache_page it again next time? It doesn't seem to work at least with redis cache backend. – eugene Sep 4 '14 at 1:26
    
I think args=[] in argument list is dangerous isn't it? Try this def my_func(args=[]): args.append('a') return args for i in xrange(5): print my_func() – rabbit.aaron Jun 5 '15 at 7:34

I wrote Django-groupcache for this kind of situations (you can download the code here). In your case, you could write:

from groupcache.decorators import cache_tagged_page

@cache_tagged_page("blog", 60 * 15)
def blog(request):
    ...

From there, you could simply do later on:

from groupcache.utils import uncache_from_tag

# Uncache all view responses tagged as "blog"
uncache_from_tag("blog") 

Have a look at cache_page_against_model() as well: it's slightly more involved, but it will allow you to uncache responses automatically based on model entity changes.

share|improve this answer
    
django-groupcache is still in active development :D – omouse May 30 '13 at 18:03
    
@omouse But the latest release is in 2011... – laike9m Sep 12 '15 at 14:06
    
@laike9m latest commit was in 2013. I am going to say it's a dead project now however that doesn't mean it won't still work with latest versions of Django. – omouse Oct 11 '15 at 14:45

This won't work on django 1.7; as you can see here https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/releases/1.7/#cache-keys-are-now-generated-from-the-request-s-absolute-url the new cache keys are generated with the full URL, so a path-only fake request won't work. You must setup properly request host value.

fake_meta = {'HTTP_HOST':'myhost',}
request.META = fake_meta

If you have multiple domains working with the same views, you should cycle them in the HTTP_HOST, get proper key and do the clean for each one.

share|improve this answer
1  
Appart from the HTTP_HOST you need the SERVER_PORT too, but I could not be able to retrieve the right key with this method (in devel enviroment): fake_meta = {'HTTP_HOST':'127.0.0.1', 'SERVER_PORT': 8000} request.META = fake_meta – r0sk May 1 '15 at 10:51

Instead of using the cache page decorator, you could manually cache the blog post object (or similar) if there are no comments, and then when there's a first comment, re-cache the blog post object so that it's up to date (assuming the object has attributes that reference any comments), but then just let that cached data for the commented blog post expire and then no bother re-cacheing...

share|improve this answer
    
I think caching the whole response might be an idea. Looking into that. Thanks. – Nixarn Feb 16 '10 at 21:04

FWIW I had to modify mazelife's solution to get it working:

def expire_view_cache(view_name, args=[], namespace=None, key_prefix=None, method="GET"):
    """
    This function allows you to invalidate any view-level cache. 
        view_name: view function you wish to invalidate or it's named url pattern
        args: any arguments passed to the view function
        namepace: optioal, if an application namespace is needed
        key prefix: for the @cache_page decorator for the function (if any)

        from: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2268417/expire-a-view-cache-in-django
        added: method to request to get the key generating properly
    """
    from django.core.urlresolvers import reverse
    from django.http import HttpRequest
    from django.utils.cache import get_cache_key
    from django.core.cache import cache
    # create a fake request object
    request = HttpRequest()
    request.method = method
    # Loookup the request path:
    if namespace:
        view_name = namespace + ":" + view_name
    request.path = reverse(view_name, args=args)
    # get cache key, expire if the cached item exists:
    key = get_cache_key(request, key_prefix=key_prefix)
    if key:
        if cache.get(key):
            cache.set(key, None, 0)
        return True
    return False
share|improve this answer

The cache_page decorator will use CacheMiddleware in the end which will generate a cache key based on the request (look at django.utils.cache.get_cache_key) and the key_prefix ("blog" in your case). Note that "blog" is only a prefix, not the whole cache key.

You can get notified via django's post_save signal when a comment is saved, then you can try to build the cache key for the appropriate page(s) and finally say cache.delete(key).

However this requires the cache_key, which is constructed with the request for the previously cached view. This request object is not available when a comment is saved. You could construct the cache key without the proper request object, but this construction happens in a function marked as private (_generate_cache_header_key), so you are not supposed to use this function directly. However, you could build an object that has a path attribute that is the same as for the original cached view and Django wouldn't notice, but I don't recommend that.

The cache_page decorator abstracts caching quite a bit for you and makes it hard to delete a certain cache object directly. You could make up your own keys and handle them in the same way, but this requires some more programming and is not as abstract as the cache_page decorator.

You will also have to delete multiple cache objects when your comments are displayed in multiple views (i.e. index page with comment counts and individual blog entry pages).

To sum up: Django does time based expiration of cache keys for you, but custom deletion of cache keys at the right time is more tricky.

share|improve this answer

Instead of explicit cache expiration you could probably use new "key_prefix" every time somebody comment the post. E.g. it might be datetime of the last post's comment (you could even combine this value with the Last-Modified header).

Unfortunately Django (including cache_page()) does not support dynamic "key_prefix"es (checked on Django 1.9) but there is workaround exists. You can implement your own cache_page() which may use extended CacheMiddleware with dynamic "key_prefix" support included. For example:

from django.middleware.cache import CacheMiddleware
from django.utils.decorators import decorator_from_middleware_with_args

def extended_cache_page(cache_timeout, key_prefix=None, cache=None):
    return decorator_from_middleware_with_args(ExtendedCacheMiddleware)(
        cache_timeout=cache_timeout,
        cache_alias=cache,
        key_prefix=key_prefix,
    )

class ExtendedCacheMiddleware(CacheMiddleware):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super().__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        if callable(self.key_prefix):
            self.key_function = self.key_prefix

    def key_function(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
        return self.key_prefix

    def get_key_prefix(self, request):
        return self.key_function(
            request,
            *request.resolver_match.args,
            **request.resolver_match.kwargs
        )

    def process_request(self, request):
        self.key_prefix = self.get_key_prefix(request)
        return super().process_request(request)

    def process_response(self, request, response):
        self.key_prefix = self.get_key_prefix(request)
        return super().process_response(request, response)

Then in your code:

from django.utils.lru_cache import lru_cache

@lru_cache()
def last_modified(request, blog_id):
    """return fresh key_prefix"""

@extended_cache_page(60 * 15, key_prefix=last_modified)
def view_blog(request, blog_id):
    """view blog page with comments"""
share|improve this answer

Django view cache invalidation for v1.7 and above. Tested on Django 1.9.

def invalidate_cache(path=''):
    ''' this function uses Django's caching function get_cache_key(). Since 1.7, 
        Django has used more variables from the request object (scheme, host, 
        path, and query string) in order to create the MD5 hashed part of the
        cache_key. Additionally, Django will use your server's timezone and 
        language as properties as well. If internationalization is important to
        your application, you will most likely need to adapt this function to
        handle that appropriately.
    '''
    from django.core.cache import cache
    from django.http import HttpRequest
    from django.utils.cache import get_cache_key

    # Bootstrap request:
    #   request.path should point to the view endpoint you want to invalidate
    #   request.META must include the correct SERVER_NAME and SERVER_PORT as django uses these in order
    #   to build a MD5 hashed value for the cache_key. Similarly, we need to artificially set the 
    #   language code on the request to 'en-us' to match the initial creation of the cache_key. 
    #   YMMV regarding the language code.        
    request = HttpRequest()
    request.META = {'SERVER_NAME':'localhost','SERVER_PORT':8000}
    request.LANGUAGE_CODE = 'en-us'
    request.path = path

    try:
        cache_key = get_cache_key(request)
        if cache_key :
            if cache.has_key(cache_key):
                cache.delete(cache_key)
                return (True, 'successfully invalidated')
            else:
                return (False, 'cache_key does not exist in cache')
        else:
            raise ValueError('failed to create cache_key')
    except (ValueError, Exception) as e:            
        return (False, e)

Usage:

status, message = invalidate_cache(path='/api/v1/blog/')

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