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With Q I can define a new promise with:

var queue = q();

But with Bluebird if I do:

var queue = new Promise();

I get:

TypeError: the promise constructor requires a resolver function

How can I get the same result that I had with Q?

This is a snippet of my code:

var queue    = q()
    promises = [];
queue = queue.then(function () {
    return Main.gitControl.gitAdd(fileObj.filename, updateIndex);
});
// Here more promises are added to queue in the same way used above...
promises.push(queue);
return Promise.all(promises).then(function () {
   // ...
});
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FYI the q function is same as Promise.cast while Promise function is same as q.promise. So the equivalent of q() is Promise.cast() –  Esailija Mar 29 at 7:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted
var resolver = Promise.defer();
setTimeout(function() {
    resolver.resolve(something); // Resolve the value
}, 5000);
return resolver.promise;

This line is quite often used in the documentation.

Be aware that this is usually an anti-pattern to use that. But if you know what you're doing, Promise.defer() is a way to get the resolver that is similar Q's way.

It is, however, discouraged to use this method. Bluebird has even deprecated it.

Instead, you should use this way:

return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
    // Your code
});

See the relevant documentation bits: Promise.defer() and new Promise().


After the update of your question, here is your issue: you're reusing the same promise to resolve several values. A promise can only be resolved once. It means you have to use Promise.defer() as many times as you have promises.

That said, after seeing more of your code, it seems you're really using anti-patterns. One advantage of using promises is error handling. For your case, you'd just need the following code:

var gitControl = Promise.promisifyAll(Main.gitControl);
var promises = [];
promises.push(gitControl.gitAddAsync(fileObj.filename, updateIndex));
return promises;

This should be enough to handle your use case. It is a lot clearer, and it also has the advantage of really handling the errors correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll put a "FIXME" to replace the current method with the reccomended one. About the Q's way... Should I use var resolver = Promise.defer(),queue = new Promise(resolver);? It throws the same error. –  Fez Vrasta Mar 27 at 10:38
    
@FezVrasta see the progress example to see the usage of Promise.defer(). –  Florian Margaine Mar 27 at 10:40
    
@FezVrasta or see my updated answer. –  Florian Margaine Mar 27 at 10:45
    
I've updated my question adding a snippet of my code, I can't implement your suggested method there, I get the same error... May you help me? –  Fez Vrasta Mar 27 at 10:47
    
@FezVrasta you're only adding one promise to your promises array in your example. Is that only for the sake of the example? –  Florian Margaine Mar 27 at 10:48

Florian provided a good answer For the sake of your original question, there are several ways to start a chain with Bluebird.

One of the simplest is calling Promise.resolve() on nothing:

var queue = Promise.resolve();//resolve a promise with nothing or cast a value
//OR
Promise.try(function(...){
    return ...//chain here
});

So you can do:

var queue    = Promise.resolve()
    promises = [];
queue = queue.then(function () {
    return Main.gitControl.gitAdd(fileObj.filename, updateIndex);
});

// Here more promises are added to queue in the same way used above...
promises.push(queue);
return Promise.all(promises).then(function () {
   // ...
});

Although, personally I'd do something like:

//arr is your array of fileObj and updateIndex

Promise.map(arr,function(f){ return Main.gitControl.gitAdd(f.filename,f.updateIndex).
    then (function(result){
        //results here
    });
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If you want each gitAdd to wait for the next, you should use Promise.reduce instead of Promise.map. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Mar 27 at 14:06
3  
Why is Promise.resolve() better than Promise.cast()? –  Florian Margaine May 12 at 12:16
2  
@FlorianMargaine good quesiton, Promsie.resolve is in the ES6 spec, when the API was created Promise.cast and Promise.resolve were both in the ES6 spec and Bluebird, I assume that .cast is going to be dropped in Bluebird 2.0. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 12 at 12:19
1  
Both Bluebird.defer() and Bluebird.cast() are deprecated in 2.x versions, and to start a "clean" promise chain, it's better to use Bluebird.resolve() –  pocesar Jul 4 at 23:02
    
@pocesar that is correct, I'll remove the .cast as we deprecated it in 2.0 (or even 1.X iirc), where am I missing the .defer here? –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Aug 27 at 10:18

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