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Ideally I would like to be able to redirect assignment to my classes rather than the built in Python classes. For instance:

class MyInt(int):
    def __add__(self, other):
         #some type checking logic
         #convert string to int if needed
         return int(self) + int(other)
    # def __everything_else__ ...
a = 1

# sure I could declare:
a = MyInt(1)
# but this isn't ideal because:
b = 2

print a + b # cool, this uses my overload
print b + a # hmmm, not my logic, bad

#Now consider:
c = "1"

print b < c # Does not make sense, really 2 < 1, not very Perly :)

The environment is IronPython 2.7 Any thoughts? I know it is against the python mantra to force typing on folks but sometimes people need to be protected from themselves, particularly when no errors are thrown. Case in point: How does Python compare string and int? This is a massive case against python as the scripting environment for us, particularly as we need to port Perl code (see "type as you use"). Really I think I may be relying too much on compiler errors as .NET is the runtime but it is important for errors to not cascade.

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Define __radd__, and b + a will use your method too. –  user2357112 Mar 27 '14 at 11:27
3  
Changing literals to use your types isn't really what you want. After all, len(thing) isn't a literal, but you're going to want that to be a MyInt too. I might say what you want is to change the behavior of mixed-type operations for built-in types, but that's not quite general enough. I think what you want is Perl. If you want to try to make Python behave like Perl at such a low level as this, you're going to run into zillions of other headaches. I recommend either sticking with Perl, or changing the code that relies on Perl-style behavior when you port it. –  user2357112 Mar 27 '14 at 11:34
    
Thank you. I agree and Perl has served us well but it is so difficult for the people I need to use it. The answer I have is a script that parses their script types to an ast and makes sure all the 'gotchas' aren't there. At some really low level I need python to behave differently but modifying and recompiling the source may take a bit too much time. Thank you again. –  user3468127 Mar 27 '14 at 12:01
    
@user2357112 Short of the possibility of forking IronPython and customising it, I think that's basically an answer and should be posted as such :) –  Jon Clements Mar 27 '14 at 12:01
    
...and looking at your question again, I see that you never said anything about literals. You said "change the default typing of variables", perhaps implying some sort of static typing and automatic conversion on assignment. Most of the comment still holds, but I think sleep deprivation is kicking in. Time for bed. –  user2357112 Mar 27 '14 at 12:03

1 Answer 1

Changing literals to use your types isn't really what you want. After all, len(thing) isn't a literal, but you're going to want that to be a MyInt too. I might say what you want is to change the behavior of mixed-type operations for built-in types, but that's not quite general enough. I think what you want is Perl. If you want to try to make Python behave like Perl at such a low level as this, you're going to run into zillions of other headaches. I recommend either sticking with Perl, or changing the code that relies on Perl-style behavior when you port it.

Indeed. It isn't just an operator overloading exercise, it is at the core of the language. There is code, that its behavior would possibly change by meddling with the fundamental types.

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