Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

From a Python script, I need to write two matrices of float in a text file and in a second Python script I want to read the text file again. So I tried in this way:

#ElR is the first matrix and ShR is the second matrix
with open("house.txt", "w") as fE:
    fE.writelines(','.join(str(j) for j in i) + '\n' for i in ElR)

with open("house.txt", "w") as fS:
    fS.writelines(','.join(str(j) for j in i) + '\n' for i in ShR)

Doing this, however, write in the text file only the values of ShR and not the values of ElR. What is wrong in it? Moreover, is that any way to read the text file and save the two matrices in other matrices? The desired script would look something like this (I guess):

r_file = open("house.txt", "r")
new_ElR = r_file.readline()
new_ShR = r_file.readline()
r_file.close()
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to open the file with the append mode.

#ElR is the first matrix and ShR is the second matrix
with open("house.txt", "w") as fE:
    fE.writelines(','.join(str(j) for j in i) + '\n' for i in ElR)

with open("house.txt", "a") as fS: # <-- notice the a
    fS.writelines(','.join(str(j) for j in i) + '\n' for i in ShR)

Now you're overwriting the file in the second with-block. Using the above solution you'll overwrite an existing file in the first one, and append to that file in the second one.

Or as mentioned in the comments to this answer, you can write it all in one go.

#ElR is the first matrix and ShR is the second matrix
with open("house.txt", "w") as fE:
    fE.writelines(','.join(str(j) for j in i) + '\n' for i in ElR)
    fE.writelines(','.join(str(j) for j in i) + '\n' for i in ShR)

You can shorten that by concatenating the lists..

with open("house.txt", "w") as fE:
    fE.writelines(','.join(str(j) for j in i) + "\n" for i in ElR + ShR)

If the matrices do not need to be human readable, I would serialize them using pickle and avoid having to recreate them. Something like:

>>> import pickle
>>> with open("my_matrices.pkl", "wb") as f:
...    pickle.dump(my_matrix_object, f)
...

And when you need them..

>>> with open("my_matrices.pkl", "rb") as f:
...    matrix = pickle.load(f)
...
share|improve this answer
1  
or OP can just use one with open() and write all at once... –  m.wasowski Mar 27 at 11:57
    
@m.wasowski Ah yes, I'll add that. –  msvalkon Mar 27 at 11:59
1  
The solution using pickle works better for my purposes. So I've done it and it works. Thanks a lot guys! –  Francesco Sgaramella Mar 27 at 12:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.