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I need to trim New Line (Chr(13) and Chr(10) and Tab space from the beginning and end of a String) in an Oracle query. I learnt that there is no easy way to trim multiple characters in Oracle. "trim" function trims only single character. It would be a performance degradation if i call trim function recursivelly in a loop using a function. I heard regexp_replace can match the whitespaces and remove them. Can you guide of a reliable way to use regexp_replace to trim multiple tabspaces or new lines or combinations of them in beginning and end of a String. If there is any other way, Please guide me.

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The "trim" function doesn't just remove a single character. It removes all whitespace. –  Nick Pierpoint Feb 16 '10 at 17:24
    
Hi Seshan. Were any of the answers below useful? –  Nick Pierpoint Feb 22 '10 at 23:12
    
I am going to check on that. Will check and let you know.. –  Seshan Feb 25 '10 at 14:41

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

How about the quick and dirty translate function?

This will remove all occurrences of each character in string1:

SELECT translate(
           translate(
               translate(string1, CHR(10), '')
           , CHR(13), '')
       , CHR(09), '') as massaged
FROM BLAH;

Regexp_replace is an option, but you may see a performance hit depending on how complex your expression is.

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you saved my day –  jorgeu Mar 7 '12 at 15:16

If you have Oracle 10g, REGEXP_REPLACE is pretty flexible.

Using the following string as a test:

chr(9) || 'Q   qwer' || chr(9) || chr(10) ||
chr(13) || 'qwerqwer     qwerty' || chr(9) || 
chr(10) || chr(13)

The [[:space:]] will remove all whitespace, and the ([[:cntrl:]])|(^\t) regexp will remove non-printing characters and tabs.

select
    tester,
    regexp_replace(tester, '[[:space:]]',null)
            regexp_tester_1,
    regexp_replace(tester, '([[:cntrl:]])|(^\t)',null) 
            regexp_tester_2
from
    (
    select
        chr(9) || 'Q   qwer' || chr(9) || chr(10) ||
                chr(13) || 'qwerqwer     qwerty' || chr(9) || 
                chr(10) || chr(13) tester 
    from 
        dual
    )

Returning:

  • REGEXP_TESTER_1: "Qqwerqwerqwerqwerty"
  • REGEXP_TESTER_2: "Q qwerqwerqwer qwerty"

Hope this is of some use.

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You could use both LTRIM and RTRIM.

select rtrim(ltrim('abcdab','ab'),'ab') from dual;

If you want to trim CHR(13) only when it comes with a CHR(10) it gets more complicated. Firstly, translated the combined string to a single character. Then LTRIM/RTRIM that character, then replace the single character back to the combined string.

select replace(rtrim(ltrim(replace('abccccabcccaab','ab','#'),'#'),'#'),'#','ab') from dual;
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For what version of Oracle? 10g+ supports regexes - see this thread on the OTN Discussion forum for how to use REGEXP_REPLACE to change non-printable characters into ''.

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In cases where the Oracle solution seems overly convoluted, I create a java class with static methods and then install it as a package in Oracle. This might not be as performant, but you will eventually find other cases (date conversion to milliseconds for example) where you will find the java fallback helpful.

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I found all of the choices above produced output on a newline in the csv and removed the separator character.

So when selecting multiple columns into a csv the results produced any columns employing a function on a new line in the csv without separator character.

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This how I would implement it:

     REGEXP_REPLACE(text,'(^[[:space:]]*|[[:space:]]*$)')
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