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I'm initializing some google maps, where a lot of data is sent via ajax and identifiers, but I'm running into a weird scope issue (or so I believe).

My initializing call is...

$(".dataMap").each(function(i, obj){
var mapID = $(this).attr('mapID');
if(mapID !== "undefined"){
    var mapBox = $(this);
    var mapBoxID = $(this).attr('id');
    //get our data
    var jsonp_url = "url-removed-for-security";
    $.getJSON(jsonp_url, function(data){
        //now we start creating our map.
        //first, lets work on sizing.
        var myOptions = {
            zoom: 11,
            center: new google.maps.LatLng(42.351391443036654, -83.09239196777344),
            mapTypeId: google.maps.MapTypeId.ROADMAP
        }
        map = new google.maps.Map(document.getElementById(mapBoxID), myOptions);
    }); // end of json call
}

});

This line works

map = new google.maps.Map(document.getElementById(mapBoxID), myOptions);

But if I change it to this...

map = new google.maps.Map(mapBox, myOptions);

it throws the error: Uncaught "TypeError: Cannot set property 'position' of undefined"

I don't understand why passing the object fails. Is that not the same equivalent to document.getElementById? If it's not, what would be? It clearly is able to detect the div I'm using, since the worked example works, lol. It's able to get the divID from the $(this) reference. I'm very stumped on this one.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted
var mapBox = $(this);

mapBox is an jQuery object. What you need is an DOM element. You can get that with:

var mapBox = $(this)[0];

There are other ways, but this should work.

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That was what I was looking for. I think up until this point, I didn't realize the difference between a jQuery object and a DOM element, I had just thought that one was a pointer to the other. – John Sly Mar 27 '14 at 20:21

It is not a scope problem. It is confusing between jQuery return values and DOM nodes.

var mapBox = $(this);

returns an array containing one element

[<div class="dataMap"></div>]

This is useless for google maps which expects a DOM node of type HTMLElement

document.getElementById(MaxBoxID) returns such a HTMLElement.


If it's not, what would be? It clearly is able to detect the div I'm using, since the worked example works, lol. It's able to get the divID from the $(this) reference. I'm very stumped on this one.

  • $(this) -> returns an array with one element containing the markup.

  • $(this).attr('id') -> returns a string you can use as reference for document.getElementById

  • document.getElementById -> returns a HTMLElement.

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