Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm developing a Flask/gevent WSGIserver webserver that needs to communicate (in the background) with a hardware device over two sockets using XML.

One socket is initiated by the client (my application) and I can send XML commands to the device. The device answers on a different port and sends back information that my application has to confirm. So my application has to listen to this second port.

Up until now I have issued a command, opened the second port as a server, waited for a response from the device and closed the second port.

The problem is that it's possible that the device sends multiple responses that I have to confirm. So my solution was to keep the port open and keep responding to incoming requests. However, in the end the device is done sending requests, and my application is still listening (I don't know when the device is done), thereby blocking everything else.

This seemed like a perfect use case for a thread, so that my application launches a listening server in a separate thread. Because I'm already using gevent as a WSGI server for Flask, I can use the greenlets.

The problem is, I have looked for a good example of such a thing, but all I can find is examples of multi-threading handlers for a single socket server. I don't need to handle a lot of connections on the socket server, but I need it launched in a separate thread so it can listen for and handle incoming messages while my main program can keep sending messages. The second problem I'm running into is that in the server, I need to use some methods from my "main" class. Being relatively new to Python I'm unsure how to structure it in a way to make that possible.

class Device(object):

def __init__(self, ...):
    self.clientsocket = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
    self.serversocket = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)

def _connect_to_device(self):
    print "OPEN CONNECTION TO DEVICE"
    try:
        self.clientsocket.connect((self.ip, 5100))
    except socket.error as e:
        pass

def _disconnect_from_device(self):
    print "CLOSE CONNECTION TO DEVICE"
    self.clientsocket.close()

def deviceaction1(self, ...):
    # the data that is sent is an XML document that depends on the parameters of this method.
    self._connect_to_device()
    self._send_data(XMLdoc)
    self._wait_for_response()
    return True

def _send_data(self, data):
    print "SEND:"
    print(data)
    self.clientsocket.send(data)

def _wait_for_response(self):
    print "WAITING FOR REQUESTS FROM DEVICE (CHANNEL 1)"
    self.serversocket.bind(('10.0.0.16', 5102))
    self.serversocket.listen(5)                         # listen for answer, maximum 5 connections
    connection, address = self.serversocket.accept()
    # the data is of a specific length I can calculate
    if len(data) > 0:
        self._process_response(data)
        self.serversocket.close()

def _process_response(self, data):
    print "RECEIVED:"
    print(data)
    # here is some code that processes the incoming data and
    # responds to the device
    # this may or may not result in more incoming data



if __name__ == '__main__':
    machine = Device(ip="10.0.0.240")
    Device.deviceaction1(...)

This is (globally, I left out sensitive information) what I'm doing now. As you can see everything is sequential. If anyone can provide an example of a listening server in a separate thread (preferably using greenlets) and a way to communicate from the listening server back to the spawning thread, it would be of great help.

Thanks.

EDIT: After trying several methods, I decided to use Pythons default select() method to solve this problem. This worked, so my question regarding the use of threads is no longer relevant. Thanks for the people who provided input for your time and effort.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Hope it can provide some help, In example class if we will call tenMessageSender function then it will fire up an async thread without blocking main loop and then _zmqBasedListener will start listening on separate port untill that thread is alive. and whatever message our tenMessageSender function will send, those will be received by client and respond back to zmqBasedListener.

Server Side

import threading
import zmq
import sys

class Example:
    def __init__(self):
        self.context = zmq.Context()
        self.publisher = self.context.socket(zmq.PUB)
        self.publisher.bind('tcp://127.0.0.1:9997')
        self.subscriber = self.context.socket(zmq.SUB)
        self.thread = threading.Thread(target=self._zmqBasedListener)

    def _zmqBasedListener(self):
        self.subscriber.connect('tcp://127.0.0.1:9998')
        self.subscriber.setsockopt(zmq.SUBSCRIBE, "some_key")
        while True:
            message = self.subscriber.recv()
            print message
        sys.exit()

    def tenMessageSender(self):
        self._decideListener()
        for message in range(10):
            self.publisher.send("testid : %d: I am a task" %message)

    def _decideListener(self):
        if not self.thread.is_alive():
            print "STARTING THREAD"
            self.thread.start()

Client

import zmq
context = zmq.Context()

subscriber = context.socket(zmq.SUB)
subscriber.connect('tcp://127.0.0.1:9997')
publisher = context.socket(zmq.PUB)
publisher.bind('tcp://127.0.0.1:9998')
subscriber.setsockopt(zmq.SUBSCRIBE, "testid")
count = 0
print "Listener"
while True:
    message = subscriber.recv()
    print message
    publisher.send('some_key : Message received %d' %count)
    count+=1

Instead of thread you can use greenlet etc.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.