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We have seen much more SSL error than before when we move to a new server. The total SSL error rate is not high. Many of them are:

error:140943E8:SSL routines:SSL3_READ_BYTES:reason(1000):s3_pkt.c:1256:SSL alert number 0

We finally found these requests are actually successful requests. Why these error was generated is that openssl found these were fatal error. Add more debug info show that:

ssl_callback_info:SSL_CB_READ_ALERT fatal error close notify

But from rfc2246:

7.2.1. Closure alerts

The client and the server must share knowledge that the connection is
ending in order to avoid a truncation attack. Either party may
initiate the exchange of closing messages.

close_notify
    This message notifies the recipient that the sender will not send
    any more messages on this connection. The session becomes
    unresumable if any connection is terminated without proper
    close_notify messages with level equal to warning.

We are wondering if there some special clients send "alert 0" as fatal . Or this related some known issue of openssl. We are using openssl-1.0.1e now. Before migration we used openssl-1.0.0-25.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Update:

I investigated the access log and found almost all the "fatal alert 0" was sent by Safari on Apple devices(Mac, iPhone, iPad).

Through the code of libsecurity_ssl which the library of SSL engine. I found that this library would send "fatal alert 0" in sometimes that was totally different with other SSL libraries, for example openssl, NSS.

SSLFatalSessionAlert(SSL_AlertCloseNotify, ctx);

http://www.opensource.apple.com/source/libsecurity_ssl/libsecurity_ssl-32463/lib/sslRecord.c

This mostly occurred when Safari meet unexpected abort of the connection. As my server would not sent a "warning alert 0" to close the connection.

share|improve this question
    
It really is a fatal error in some circumstances, e.g. when a handshake message is expected. –  EJP Apr 2 at 8:46
    
Look at the rfc tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4346#section-7.27.2 Alert Protocol;7.2.1. Closure Alerts ;7.2.2. Error Alerts. It treat Closure Alerts different with Error Alerts. The rfc just said all error alerts can be fatal --- "For all errors where an alert level is not explicitly specified, the sending party MAY determine at its discretion whether this is a fatal error or not; " But haven't said that "Closure alerts" can be fatal. –  Kang Li Apr 2 at 9:10
    
That seems all "fatal alert 0" occurred in SSL_read. The SSL connection have been established. –  Kang Li Apr 2 at 9:29
    
None of that means that a close during the handshake isn't fatal. Of course it is. No handshake, no connection. –  EJP Apr 2 at 23:33

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