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I am working on a wordcount program, where I create N threads, and each thread receives a char[] buffer containing many different numbers like [2355 3326 94438 123 123...] I want to create a map where the key is the number itself, and the value is how many time it appears. I am converting from the char[] array to an integer as shown below.

However it seems that every time I call putIfAbsent(), it always returns null, meaning it did not find a key of that value. This does not make sense, as I have thousands of duplicate values in my text file. The map should end up being around 300kb, instead it is more than a gigabyte.

newbyte[] is a char[] containing ONLY numbers and spaces

Why does putIfAbsent always return null?

Also, when I print the map when finished, it looks like this:

233303192 = 1
1770057208 = 1
1323329638 = 1
1278321050 = 1
962422124 = 1
472527478 = 1
936125441 = 1
-350637153 = 1
-601349585 = 1

Which is quite odd, because the largest value of any input is 65535. Not sure how this makes any sense.

        public void run() {
            int counter = 0; int i; Integer check;  int j =0; int temp = 0; int intbuilder = 0;
            for (i = 0; i < newbyte.length; i++) {
                    if (newbyte[i] != ' ') { //delimiter is not found, so add to temp char array
                            intbuilder = (intbuilder * 10) + (int)newbyte[i];
                            counter++;
                    }
                    else {    
                            check = wordCountMap.putIfAbsent(intbuilder, 1);
                            if (check != null) { 
                                    wordCountMap.put(intbuilder, check + 1);
                            }
                            intbuilder = 0;
share|improve this question
    
Perhaps not your problem but instead of (int)newbyte[i] you may mean (int)(newbyte[i] - '0'). –  OldCurmudgeon Mar 27 '14 at 17:31
    
You are probably right, but it didn't help. By the way, my map is an ConcurrentHashMap<Integer, Integer> –  DanGordon Mar 27 '14 at 17:41

1 Answer 1

The problem is not in the concurrent hash map. Its with the way you parse the character array

public void startThreads() throws InterruptedException{
        char[] input = {'1',' ','2',' ','3','4',' ','1',' ','2',' ','3','4',' ','1'};
        Thread workerThread = new Thread(new Worker(input));
        workerThread.start();
        workerThread.join();
        System.out.println("Count for 1 & 2 are "+countMap.get(1)+" and "+countMap.get(2));
    }

    private class Worker implements  Runnable{

        private char[] newbyte;

        public Worker(char[] newbyte){
            this.newbyte = newbyte;
        }

        @Override
        public void run()  {
            int number=0;
            for(int i=0;i< newbyte.length;i++){
                if(newbyte[i] != ' '){
                    number = (number*10)+Character.getNumericValue(newbyte[i]);
                }else{
                    Integer currentValue = countMap.putIfAbsent(number, 1);
                    if(currentValue != null){
                        countMap.put(number, currentValue+1);
                    }
                    number = 0;
                }
            }
            Integer currentValue = countMap.putIfAbsent(number, 1);
            if(currentValue != null){
                countMap.put(number, currentValue+1);
            }

        }

    }
share|improve this answer
    
Why don't you declare Integer currentValue before the loop? Not sure if it is important, just wondering. I haven't tried this code out but I'll give it a shot. It looks like you are saying the key difference is here: number = (number*10)+Character.getNumericValue(newbyte[i]); I am also a little confused as to the last three lines of code. It's outside the for loop. I'm guessing you accidentally wrote that code twice? –  DanGordon Mar 28 '14 at 2:53
    
Ok so this code works on windows when running Eclipse, but when I try to run this java program via command line on a linux server, I get my crazy results again. –  DanGordon Mar 28 '14 at 4:07
    
writing code after loop is not accidental .. if last character is not space then you will loose the last number .. try input without last character as ' '. are you executing the same program via command line on linux server or is it different with different inputs .. if you post logs it will help me answer –  yarlee Mar 28 '14 at 15:50
    
to your question declaring Integer outside loop is definitely .. but for small inputs GC should handle cleanup easily –  yarlee Mar 28 '14 at 15:52
    
I am executing the same program on a linux server. The input is technically different, but it is the same format. All the input tokens are 4 -5 digit numbers like [2352, 12345, 20890...] The output on linux server is something like this: 741926468 = 1 1290494101 = 1 703346691 = 1 -672872123 = 1 822927623 = 1 1479247979 = 1 90294613 = 1 Obviously the numbers are not even from the input, and somehow there are negative numbers. Doesn't happen on eclipse. –  DanGordon Mar 28 '14 at 17:51

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