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Hi Stack Overflow community,

I have the following problem.

I got this file called bad, with the following contents:

SPAM EATER       PO BOX 5555          FAKE STREET
FOO BAR          ìPO BOX 1234         LOLLERCOASTER VILLAGE
LOL MAN          PO BOX 9876          NEXT DOOR

I want to remove the non-ascii character from it (at the start of the second column of the second record), in order to get a file free of strange characters and with all its columns aligned. Plus, there's this one requirement to achieve this using a Perl one-liner - so, no awk, sed, or alike commands can be used. I tried the following, but got short by one space in the third column:

$ perl -plne 's/[^[:ascii:]]//g' bad > bad.clean

$ cat bad.clean
SPAM EATER       PO BOX 5555          FAKE STREET
FOO BAR          PO BOX 1234         LOLLERCOASTER VILLAGE
LOL MAN          PO BOX 9876          NEXT DOOR

I also tried using the same one-liner, but this time replacing the non-ascii character by a space. In this case, the record ended up with two extra spaces in the second column, and one extra space in the third:

$ perl -plne 's/[^[:ascii:]]/ /g' bad > bad.clean.space

$ cat bad.clean.space
SPAM EATER       PO BOX 5555          FAKE STREET
FOO BAR            PO BOX 1234         LOLLERCOASTER VILLAGE
LOL MAN          PO BOX 9876          NEXT DOOR

Somehow, the non-ascii character seems to be taking 2 bytes instead of one - Is this correct, or am I missing something?

The expected output is this:

SPAM EATER       PO BOX 5555          FAKE STREET
FOO BAR          PO BOX 1234          LOLLERCOASTER VILLAGE
LOL MAN          PO BOX 9876          NEXT DOOR

Is there a way, using a Perl one-liner, to get the results as expected? I was thinking of a way to add one space after removing the non-ascii character, in the field in which the change has been made, but I can't find the way to do it. In addition, the non-ascii character can appear on any field, not only in the second one.

By the way, some info that might be useful: This is an AIX machine, running Perl v5.8.8.

Thank you!


Edit:

As @ThisSuitIsBlackNot mentions, there are two non-ascii characters. Therefore, I guess I just want to add one space to the end of that field, if at least one non-ascii character gets removed by the command. Is there a way to get this extra space included in the same sentence, so it can be done as a one-liner as well?


Edit:

After reviewing a large set of data, I can tell that the non-ascii characters always appears as pairs, and the next field in the original file (before running the one-liner) is always one space to the right compared to the other columns. So, I'm changing the title of this question to match the requirement: Perl one-liner to remove non-ascii characters and append a space in the field where the non-ascii characters were

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1  
There are two non-ASCII characters (Ã and ¬) in your second row, not one. The output you're getting is exactly as expected. –  ThisSuitIsBlackNot Mar 27 at 19:17
    
@ThisSuitIsBlackNot - that's what I thought. So, I guess I just want to add one space to the end of that field, if at least one non-ascii character is removed. –  jim Mar 27 at 19:19
    
I would remove all the non-ASCII characters in your file first, then align the columns, since you can't know the maximum width of a particular column until you've processed the entire file. –  ThisSuitIsBlackNot Mar 27 at 19:23
    
@ThisSuitIsBlackNot it wouldn't be harder to keep track of where the characters were removed, instead of just adding the space right away? I wonder because the original files will be a lot bigger (thousand of records and several columns), the non-ascii characters could be at any column, and there might be case that some columns are empty, so aligning them afterwards might be difficult. Thanks for your replies :) –  jim Mar 27 at 19:27
2  
You need to understand that the "non-ASCII" characters are UTF-8 encoding pairs. In the case of ì that represents the character ì (0x00ec). If the input file is truly UTF-8, it's possible for there to be (somewhat rarely) 3-byte and (more rarely) 4-byte sequences. You should probably read the file using UTF-8 encoding and THEN remove the characters above 0x7F. That would solve the spacing problem you're seeing. –  Jim Garrison Mar 27 at 19:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Take out 2 non-ascii, add one space after field.
Uses non-ascii and 3 spaces as delimiter pairs.

 #  s/[^[:ascii:]]{2}(.*?[ ]{3})/$1 /g

 [^[:ascii:]]{2} 
 ( .*? [ ]{3} )

Perl test case

$/ = undef;
$str = <DATA>;
$str =~ s/[^[:ascii:]]{2}(.*?[ ]{3})/$1 /g;
print $str;

__DATA__
SPAM EATER       PO BOX 5555          FAKE STREET
FOO BAR          ìPO BOX 1234         LOLLERCOASTER VILLAGE
LOL MAN          PO BOX 9876          NEXT DOOR

Output >>

SPAM EATER       PO BOX 5555          FAKE STREET
FOO BAR          PO BOX 1234          LOLLERCOASTER VILLAGE
LOL MAN          PO BOX 9876          NEXT DOOR
share|improve this answer
    
@sin +1 - I tested this thoroughly, and I must say that this solves the issue. I used it like the line commented, just to keep using it as a one-liner: perl -plne 's/[^[:ascii:]]{2}(.*?[ ]{3})/$1 /g' bad > bad.clean. Thank you very much! –  jim Mar 28 at 13:31

This might be a silly question, but: why not column-align it by fixing the input to have the right number of spaces? The second line of your input has a different number of padding spaces between the second and third column, compared to the other lines.

If you must have unaligned input like that in the example, something like this will work (in the example's narrow case, and can be adapted using floor or something similar to work for other cases. However, I don't think it will ever really work in the general case; there's no magical "detect and correct my column size" function without using Text::Table or similar in your oneliner):

perl -plne 's/([^[:ascii:]]+?)((?:\w+\s)+?)(\s+?.+)/$2 . (" " x (int(length($1) \/ 2) - 1)) . $3/ge' bad > bad.clean

That is totally unoptimized and probably has some inefficiencies. A real regex guru could probably fold it into a handful of bytes. However, it should point you in the right direction (i.e. using functions in your right section, rather than static values). It will also only work given the constraint of two-byte characters being the only non-ASCII values in the string. That's an often-false assumption to make though. Read this excellent article by Joel Spolsky before writing another line of code; everyone who has to engage with character encodings should know the basics.

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Thanks for the idea, and great link by the way. I checked and seems like there's a missing ' at the end of your one-liner. However, once fixed it returned the second record like: FOO BAR PO BOX 1234 OLLERCOASTER VILLAGE, that is, it ate the "R" in "ROLLERCOASTER" and is one space short after the second column. –  jim Mar 27 at 20:04
    
Sorry, I meant it ate the "L" in "LOLLERCOASTER" –  jim Mar 27 at 20:41
    
I fixed it, but it's a fairly trivial thing to adapt; consider revising and understanding the regex more thoroughly, rather than using a copy-paste-test-reject process. If this challenge is a learning excercise or academic problem, asking SO to write the code for you (rather than help you learn how to write the code) seems somewhat contrary to the point. It's even more important that you understand (rather than paste) it if this will run as part of a real use case--if it will, you're virtually guaranteed to need to change it again in the future, so understanding it now is vastly preferable. –  Zac B Mar 28 at 14:46
    
No need to get angry about it :) I'm starting to learn Perl, so the try-test-fix-try_again cycle works for me, at least for now. After playing a bit with it I now understand what each piece of that expressions does, so I was able to get what was wrong in order to fix it. I'm just saying that sometimes you need to see a little example to move forward and try things on your own. I appreciate the advice and your comments, though. Thanks :) –  jim Mar 28 at 14:54

You might be able to use tr:

tr -cs '[:print:]' ' '

This will replace runs of non-printable characters with a space.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I rather use a perl-only solution. I know you can call tr within a Perl script, but it's not the idea. One of the requirements is to use this as a Perl one-liner. Thank you anyway! –  jim Mar 28 at 13:33

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