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The style guide is unclear on this case (other than just giving the opinion that it's weird and it is). I have a chain of hash/array functions to execute on a complex response object. I need to do a few sorts and selections and maps. Currently I just have a long chain of method calls but some of the blocks used for sorting and selecting are multiple lines and some are not.

Should I mix block definition types? Use only braces or only do..end blocks? Should I break it into multiple steps?

Also, if I refactor my blocks and turn them into methods, where would it be appropriate to put them? They don't really make sense in the context of the containing class as instance or class methods.

I looked around and could find no consensus on what is correct style but I am looking for a method that will pass the Ruby Style Guide (so most likely refactoring my blocks into methods, but where do I put them?)

Here is a bit of a contrived example:

def example1 (arr)
  arr.sort do |a, b|
    a_pieces = a.value.split ' '
    b_pieces = b.value.split ' '
    (a_pieces[1] + a_pieces[5]) <=> (b_pieces[1] + b_pieces[5])
  end
  .last[:some_value]
  .select do |a|
    a == 'something'
  end

end


def example2 (arr)
  arr.sort { |a, b|
    a_pieces = a.value.split ' '
    b_pieces = b.value.split ' '
    (a_pieces[1] + a_pieces[5]) <=> (b_pieces[1] + b_pieces[5])
  }
  .last[:some_value]
  .select { |a| a == 'something' }
end
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Don't use sort for this, instead, use sort_by‌​. It'll be a LOT faster for any sorting operations involving any type of calculations in the block. –  the Tin Man Mar 27 '14 at 21:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would use do ... end blocks for multi-line and curly braces { ... } for one-line code. I never use do ... end for chaining methods, except when preceding for a multi-line block. I also chain methods in the same line as longer as the code is readable and the line is no longer than 80 chars.

So your example I will code it as below:

def example1 (arr)
  arr.sort do |a, b|
    a_pieces = a.value.split ' '
    b_pieces = b.value.split ' '
    (a_pieces[1] + a_pieces[5]) <=> (b_pieces[1] + b_pieces[5])
  end.last[:some_value].select { |a| a == 'something' }
end

Although I probably will split it in two methods (actually three with the example1 one):

def sort_array(arr)
  arr.sort do |a, b|
    a_pieces = a.value.split ' '
    b_pieces = b.value.split ' '
    (a_pieces[1] + a_pieces[5]) <=> (b_pieces[1] + b_pieces[5])
  end
end

def select_item(arr)
  arr.last[:some_value].select { |a| a == 'something' }
end

def example1(arr)
  select_item(sort_array(arr))
end
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I'm not sure this would be correct style. Mixing block types looks strange and the style guide suggests that chaining any multiline block is frowned upon. –  Daniel Williams Mar 27 '14 at 20:36
    
To be honest, end.somethod also looks weird for me but it enters in conflict of using {} for multiline. So I think to mix here it is the most standard, as far as I see in others. –  Rafa Paez Mar 27 '14 at 20:48
2  
I agree with using do ... end for multi-line and { ... } for single line blocks. That results in having to mix both styles occasionally, but that is not inherently evil in my opinion. –  Daniël Knippers Mar 27 '14 at 20:52
    
Thanks for your opinion, @DaniëlKnippers. I have seen this mix code in SO users with Ks of reputation, but it would be nice to know more opinions. –  Rafa Paez Mar 27 '14 at 20:57
1  
Browsing the source of some built-in Ruby gems I do also see a lot of multi-line usage of { ... } for Blocks, though it's not consistent everywhere either.. –  Daniël Knippers Mar 27 '14 at 21:09

I'd do it something like this:

def example1(arr)

  arr.sort_by { |a|
    a_pieces = a.value.split
    (a_pieces[1] + a_pieces[5])
  }.last[:some_value]
   .select { |a| a == 'something'}

end

sort will be much slower than sort_by if there is anything beyond a simple <=> comparison of simple objects.

Stylistically, use {...} instead of do...end if you're returning a value, especially in a chain of methods. The "style guides" suggest using do...end when you're dealing with multiple lines in a block, but end.some_method is fugly and confusing. Using {...} reminds us we are passing only values and cleans up the fugliness.

Remember, they're style guides, not laws, and are really common-coding practice guidelines to help us write code readable by everyone. Consistency is important, as is readability.

Also, a bare split does the same things as split ' ' or split(' ').

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