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Edit: Just wanted to say thank you to everyone who've helped so far! I'm new to Java and my professor recommended this site for outside help. It's been great so far. I'm going to take a few moments and work on the code and implement the suggestions I've received. Thanks!

I'm trying to create a program that converts temperatures from degrees Fahrenheit to degrees Celsius, and vice-versa. If the user does not enter the correct unit, the program loops back and asks them to re-enter the unit or enter Q to quit the program. This is what I have so far:

My thinking is to incorporate a loop into the default portion of my switch statement, but I'm not sure which loop to use (maybe for?) that will loop back and ask the user to re enter the unit or Q to quit. Any help is really, really appreciated! I've been stuck on this for hours!

System.out.print("\tEnter 'F' (or 'f') for Fahrenheit or " 
            + "'C' (or 'c') for Celcius: ");
f_or_c = console.next();

double fahrenheit = 5*(temperature-32)/9;
double celcius = (9*(temperature)/5)+32;

switch (f_or_c) {
    case "C":
        case "c":
        System.out.println("\n\t" + temperature + " " + " degrees Celcius "
        + "= " + celcius + " degrees Fahrenheit.");
        break;
    case "F":
        case "f":
        System.out.println("\n\t" + temperature + " " + " degrees Fahrenheit "
        + "= " + fahrenheit + " degrees Celcius.");
        break;
    default: 
        System.out.println("\n\tUnknown units -"
        + "\n\tCannot do calculation -"
        + "\n\tPlease next time enter either 'F' for Fahrenheit or 'C' Celcius");
        System.out.print("\nEnter 'Q' to quit or " +
    "any other character to perform another temperature conversion: ");
       break;
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You're actually looking for something called a do-while loop. I tried to explain a bit in my answer how it works. –  MirroredFate Mar 27 '14 at 21:41
    
Hi. Really sorry for the late reply. I was able to figure it out and got the code to execute the way my professor wanted using the nested while loop. I did take a look at your do-while loop example because it never hurts to know more. I'll try to make another copy using the do-while loop method. Thank you. –  user3470441 Mar 28 '14 at 0:48

5 Answers 5

Let's think this through logically: you want to loop until the user enters the correct input. So, does this mean that you will know prior to starting the loop how many times the loop should iterate? This is key.

Once you know this information, the correct loop falls out, since:

  • for loops are used when you know in advance how many times you'll loop.
  • While loops are for when you don't know this information in advance.
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you're correct! We will not know how many iterations the loop will cycle through. It is completely up to the user when to end the loop, so a while loop sounds right! Would nesting the while loop inside the default of the switch statement seem wise? Or should I create the while loop and have the switch statement nested inside it? Thank you! –  user3470441 Mar 27 '14 at 21:30
    
@user3470441: the loop should enclose any code/logic that you want repeatedly called. So the switch would go inside of the while loop. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Mar 27 '14 at 21:31

You can go with while loop. There are better ways to do this. But just helping you with your code.

 System.out.print("\tEnter 'F' (or 'f') for Fahrenheit or " 
        + "'C' (or 'c') for Celcius: ");
 f_or_c = console.next();
 boolean flag=false;
 double fahrenheit = 5*(temperature-32)/9;
 double celcius = (9*(temperature)/5)+32;
 while(true) {
  switch (f_or_c) {
      case "C":
      case "c":
           System.out.println("\n\t" + temperature + " " + " degrees Celcius "
            + "= " + celcius + " degrees Fahrenheit.");
           flag=false;
           break;
     case "F":
     case "f":
           System.out.println("\n\t" + temperature + " " + " degrees Fahrenheit "
             + "= " + fahrenheit + " degrees Celcius.");
           flag=false;
           break;
     default: 
           System.out.println("\n\tUnknown units -"
           + "\n\tCannot do calculation -"
           + "\n\tPlease next time enter either 'F' for Fahrenheit or 'C' Celcius");
           System.out.print("\nEnter 'Q' to quit or " +
          "any other character to perform another temperature conversion: ");
          flag=true;
          break;
     }
    if(flag) 
        continue;
    break;
 }
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Put the switch statement into a method, and then call that method upon itself for the default case. It's using recursion, but keep in mind if you use recursion in the future, make sure it doesn't infinitely loop or you'll get a stack overflow error.

share|improve this answer
    
I had actually thought of doing things, but my professor wants us to submit a single .java file, so I think it's best to keep it all in this one program. Thank you though. –  user3470441 Mar 27 '14 at 21:32
    
He is also mentioning about single class, but multiple methods –  spiderman Mar 27 '14 at 21:48

I might be changing your way of thinking here, but I would Implement it differently. Wrap a while loop around the switch case. This will make sure the switch case is re-executed with the next user input value. I've included an example of what it could look like. Note that I haven't included the input code as there are many options for you. Also, I haven't included the quit code, it only breaks the loop.

bool repeat = TRUE;
while (repeat)
{
 switch (f_or_c) 
 {
  case "C":
      case "c":
      System.out.println("\n\t" + temperature + " " + " degrees Celcius "
      + "= " + celcius + " degrees Fahrenheit.");
      repeat = FALSE;
      break;
  case "F":
     case "f":
     System.out.println("\n\t" + temperature + " " + " degrees Fahrenheit "
     + "= " + fahrenheit + " degrees Celcius.");
     repeat = FALSE;
     break;
  case "Q":
     ***YOUR CODE TO QUIT***
     repeat = FALSE;
     break;
  default: 
     System.out.println("\n\tUnknown units -"
     + "\n\tCannot do calculation -"
     + "\n\tPlease next time enter either 'F' for Fahrenheit or 'C' Celcius");
     System.out.print("\nEnter 'Q' to quit or " +
     "any other character to perform another temperature conversion: ");
     ***CODE TO PROMPT USER FOR  F_OR_C VALUE***
     repeat = TRUE;
     break; 
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was actually thinking about doing this. I realized it might be more efficient to nest the switch inside the while loop, as another user pointed out. Thank you! I'm going to try rewriting the code over so that the switch is nested inside the while. –  user3470441 Mar 27 '14 at 21:45
    
The advice to wrap a while loop around the switch statement worked smoothly! Thanks everyone! –  user3470441 Mar 27 '14 at 22:05

How about a do{}while()?

boolean badInput;
do {

    badInput = false;
    System.out.print("\tEnter 'F' (or 'f') for Fahrenheit or " 
                + "'C' (or 'c') for Celcius: ");
    f_or_c = console.next();

    double fahrenheit = 5*(temperature-32)/9;
    double celcius = (9*(temperature)/5)+32;

    switch (f_or_c) {
        case "C":
            case "c":
            System.out.println("\n\t" + temperature + " " + " degrees Celcius "
            + "= " + celcius + " degrees Fahrenheit.");
            break;
        case "F":
            case "f":
            System.out.println("\n\t" + temperature + " " + " degrees Fahrenheit "
            + "= " + fahrenheit + " degrees Celcius.");
            break;
        default: 
            System.out.println("\n\tUnknown units -"
            + "\n\tCannot do calculation -"
            + "\n\tPlease next time enter either 'F' for Fahrenheit or 'C' Celcius");
            System.out.print("\nEnter 'Q' to quit or " +
        "any other character to perform another temperature conversion: ");
           badInput = true; //we got bad input so we'll continue looping
           break;

} while(badInput);

Essentially we set badInput to false at the beginning, assuming it to be good input. If we end up getting bad input, we make badInput true, so we will continue looping.

The general difference between a do-while and a while loop is that do-whiles are used for code that you want to execute at least once. It works well in this case, because you know you want to read input at least once.

In my example, the variable badInput is called a flag. Basically, a flag is just a variable that tracks whether something is "on" or "off". In this case, badInput is tracking whether or not we have bad input. Its a simple "on" "off", "true" "false" scenario.

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