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I have this factorial app that's supposed to go infinite if answer is always "y".

def continue?
  answer = gets
  if answer.downcase == "y"
    main
  elsif answer.downcase == "n"
    exit
  else
    "This means n to me. Follow the rules next time. Bye."
  end
end

def main
  p "Enter any Integer"

  out = gets

  num = out.to_i
  def factorial(num)
    sum = num
    (num-1).times {sum = sum * (num - 1); num = num-1}
    sum
  end

  p factorial(num)
  p "Do you want another number"
  continue?
end

main

At first, #continue? was at the end of the app, but then when I called continue in #main I'd get an error for non-existing Method. So, I moved #continue? to the top but now I can't call #main because of the same method error again. I can put #continue? inside #main method but I don't think it will do a lot. Is there a better way for handling this kind of situation?

If my code is off or my practice is not the best please let me know. And I'd use #inject for factorial but I was working with ruby 1.8.5 so I had to do what I could.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all, calling main from another function is weird because main should only be called once when the program starts.

Second, if you do it this way you're going to run out of memory because your callstack is going to keep growing (main, continue, main continue, ...)

Why don't you make continue? return a true or false value. Then in main you can write

begin
    p "Enter any Integer"

    out = gets

    num = out.to_i
    def factorial(num)
      sum = num
      (num-1).times {sum = sum * (num - 1); num = num-1}
      sum
    end

    p factorial(num)
    p "Do you want another number"
  end while continue?
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Yes. This makes much more sense. Thanks for clearing stuff up for me. And I never really thought about it memory-wise because it's just a small snippet. –  FiberBro Mar 27 '14 at 22:39
    
Good answer, but I would question your begin...end block. Why not just while continue? ... end? –  Zach Kemp Mar 27 '14 at 22:40
    
@ZachKemp Well, it's fair to assume the code should execute at least once, after which the user can decide to run it again. In such a scenario, a begin ... end while continue? makes more sense than while continue? ... end. In this case it would be weird to ask to continue before having even started. –  Daniël Knippers Mar 27 '14 at 23:27
    
@DaniëlKnippers: I guess that makes sense. It's not a construction I see very often. –  Zach Kemp Mar 27 '14 at 23:44

You could put the condition in a while loop instead of calling the function every time. Also, take care with gets method, you should strip the input.

def continue?
  answer = gets.strip
  if answer.downcase == "y"
    true 
  elsif answer.downcase == "n"
    false 
  else
    p "This means n to me. Follow the rules next time. Bye."
    false
  end
end

def main
  begin
    p "Enter any Integer"

    out = gets

    num = out.to_i
    def factorial(num)
      sum = num
      (num-1).times {sum = sum * (num - 1); num = num-1}
      sum
    end

    p factorial(num)
    p "Do you want another number"
  end while continue?
end

main
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You've got a couple of problems. First, when you do answer = gets what you're getting isn't just a letter, it's a letter followed by a linefeed, e.g. 'y\n'. The solution is to use str#chomp. Also, you're not actually showing anything when a letter other than 'y' or 'n' is entered. Here's the fixed method:

def continue?
  answer = gets.chomp
  if answer.downcase == "y"
    main
  elsif answer.downcase == "n"
    exit
  else
    puts "This means n to me. Follow the rules next time. Bye."
  end
end
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